work art – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 16:22:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jeanspezial.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png work art – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ 32 32 Art Appreciation: Where Beauty Begins | Life & Arts https://jeanspezial.com/art-appreciation-where-beauty-begins-life-arts/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 15:54:53 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/art-appreciation-where-beauty-begins-life-arts/ The art is difficult to understand, with many descriptions varying by period, expert interpretation, and social norms. The understanding of art was attributed to the ranks of the upper class. Throughout history, art and portrait commissions have been primarily available to the wealthy with limited access to the general public, and over time this practice […]]]>

The art is difficult to understand, with many descriptions varying by period, expert interpretation, and social norms. The understanding of art was attributed to the ranks of the upper class. Throughout history, art and portrait commissions have been primarily available to the wealthy with limited access to the general public, and over time this practice has continued. Middle- and lower-class populations began to see art as a medium that stood out from those who were sufficiently sophisticated. The only difference between middle class and upper class is money, otherwise they are all human.

As previously mentioned, art is an experience that elicits a response, which can range from transcendental enlightenment to terrifying terror. Such reactions occur due to personal experiences, biases, beliefs and practices, each of which varies from person to person. No matter what artwork we will react to a work, but many of us won’t mention why. Although the understanding of art is subject to much critical analysis, contradiction and confusion, asking the simple question “Why?” is a step forward.

While personal perspectives are the dependent variable of an artistic experience, what is independent and will always be perceived are its characteristics, which include important characteristics such as: who or what is the subject? Who is in the scene? Is it historical or contemporary? Does he share a message? How is it presented? Even smaller but basic details add to the perception, like: What colors were used? How is the lighting used? How is the brush stroke used? What is the size of the room? Where, or how, is it shown?

Once we have questioned and identified these factors, we can ask the introspective questions of why it is beautiful, shameful, mocking, satirical, etc. the length and steps the artist took to convey such sentiment. And in such a performance of human emotion and connectedness, that’s where we find the beauty. As viewers, we have the task of filtering the piece through our emotions, then tweaking and refining that experience with the journey in understanding its reaction.

The most widely accepted and pleasing work of art which has become the adequate symbol of beauty is the work of Botticelli”The birth of Venus”, appealing to all the senses of beauty in human consciousness. The goddess of beauty and love emerges from the pristine nature, being presented in the vulnerability of the nude, presented with clothes and flowers by figures rushing to her side as if authority and power had been given since birth. Botticelli’s use of supple skin and delicate fabrics adds to the serenity of the piece. From its material to its theme, beauty is the pinnacle of the piece.

A much more complicated piece that contemplates beauty is that of Edward Okun”war and us», mixing aesthetics and vehemence in a homogeneous way. A frenzy of serpent-like beings colored vibrant blue and decorated with butterfly wings on their heads bite and thrash about in the turmoil around the centerpiece of the painting. Three human figures painted in dark, solid colors calmly cross the chaotic landscape. While the dynamism of the snakes draws the viewer’s attention a lot, the stark contrast caused by the central characters brings a sense of humility, hope and peace. We see that Okun wanted to achieve this level of contrast, and such oxymoronic elements elevate us to the feeling that Okun was aiming to achieve.

Such a view of art appreciation can work in other forms, such as photography, music, dance, food, fashion, and even furniture. The appreciation we give to these details in our daily lives can lift us into a much more attractive world.

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Malaysian artists turn trash into works of art https://jeanspezial.com/malaysian-artists-turn-trash-into-works-of-art/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/malaysian-artists-turn-trash-into-works-of-art/ Local artist Joanne Loo is aware of the enormity of environmental issues like global warming, acid rain and water pollution. And she is consciously looking at ways to minimize her carbon footprint. Over the past five months, Loo, 30, and Ummi Khaltum Junid, 35, a British-based, Malaysian-born batik artist, have been working on Projek Trash […]]]>

Local artist Joanne Loo is aware of the enormity of environmental issues like global warming, acid rain and water pollution. And she is consciously looking at ways to minimize her carbon footprint.

Over the past five months, Loo, 30, and Ummi Khaltum Junid, 35, a British-based, Malaysian-born batik artist, have been working on Projek Trash Treasure, where they turn trash into creative works .

“Last October, Ummi and I came across the British Council’s open call for connections across culture, and we were interested to see how we could explore the possibility of working together.

“Our discussions brought us to the topic of eco-sustainability and environmental issues, seen through the lens of someone with a creative practice,” Loo recently said.

Projek Trash Treasure’s goal is to explore ways to reuse what would otherwise be thrown away, says Loo. Photo: Joanne Loo

Projek Trash Treasure celebrates waste as a cultural meeting point. Eight artists from Malaysia and Britain undertook this project by engaging in a creative exchange using waste as a point of contact.

The residency ends with an exhibition of the creative results in Great Britain and Malaysia. The Malaysian exhibition takes place from this Friday to Sunday.

Textile artist Caroline Hyde-Brown, artist Genevieve Rudd and documentary filmmaker Nur Hannah Wan represent Britain. Local artists include multidisciplinary digital artist Abdul Shakir, artist Fariza Azlina and new media artist KC Tan.

At the beginning of the residency, each artist identified waste from their creative practices and personal lifestyles. Waste from both countries was then exchanged and used to forge new narratives and creative outcomes.

Fariza's art creation includes pieces of Ummi's plastic that have been heated together to form shavings.  Photo: Fariza AzlinaFariza’s art creation includes pieces of Ummi’s plastic that have been heated together to form shavings. Photo: Fariza Azlina

In order to minimize shipping costs, each artist has been allocated a maximum of 5 kg for each package.

“Each artist could only make the exchange once. This created some restrictions for all artists to consider when choosing their ‘trash can’ that were interesting to navigate,” Loo explained.

The assortment of trash collected included leftover batik, used tea bags, linocuts, beach plastic and take-out packaging.

“Once the materials were consolidated and exchanged, our discussions developed to reinterpret the materials received. It was interesting to see the organic ways these materials blend into the country they arrived in, as well as the personal experiences and creative journey of the artists,” she added.

The materials have been used in experiments with cyanotype, embroidery, dyeing, and digital applications such as projection mapping and video capture.

Rudd conceptualized a <a class=work of art using 3D plastic, seawater and foraged algae. Photo: Genevieve Rudd” src=”https://apicms.thestar.com.my/uploads/images/2022/02/16/1482966.jpg” onerror=”this.src=” https:=”” style=”float: right; width: 300px; height: 367px;”/>Rudd conceptualized a work of art using 3D plastic, seawater and foraged algae. Photo: Genevieve Rudd

According to Loo, the residency aims to explore ways to reuse what would otherwise be thrown away. For example, she hopes to examine the possibility of cultural sharing between Britain and Malaysia with waste as a starting point.

“Ummi and I want to use this platform to open conversations about sustainable creative practices with creative practitioners in Britain and Malaysia, in the hopes of creating a community that can grow in the future.

“Throughout this residency, we believe that if the eight participating artists are more aware of the environmental impact of their individual practices and spread this awareness to their creative colleagues, it is quite an achievement for we.”

For Loo, the five-month residency was an educational experience filled with many enriching experiences.

“As an artist who has never really grasped the concept of sustainability, this residency has been an eye-opening and humbling experience. We have learned so much from each other over the months.

“Creating art can often be a solitary experience. Being able to meet other artists online to share ideas has had a powerful impact on us. Often we are motivated by the enthusiasm of the other, whether in sustainable practices or simply by being creative. »

What we do now will impact the future, says Ummi.  Photo: Ummi Kalthum Junid What we do now will impact the future, says Ummi. Photo: Ummi Kalthum Junid

Ummi, the founder of Dunia Motif, an artisan canting (hand-drawn) batik label using natural dyes, says the project has further strengthened her connection to waste.

Also, it broadened his perspective on finding and finding more meaningful meaning in defining waste as a resource.

“To be Malaysian is also to be a citizen of the world. What we do now will impact the future. The practice of refusing, reducing, reusing, reusing and recycling (5R) would allow waste to be recovered (resource generation), especially in production and consumption.

Practicing the 5Rs is everyone’s responsibility. We shouldn’t believe that living a sustainable lifestyle involves being a complete eco-practitioner. Start small. Be practical, but above all, be aware of our definition of “comfort”. I believe this can eventually lead to a sustainable life.

Projek Trash Treasure (Malaysian Exhibition) will be held at FabU Café, Sunway Metro, Bandar Sunway in Petaling Jaya from February 18-20. For appointment slots, register at projektrashtreasure.com.

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Public Art Competition for Brunswick Center Scarborough https://jeanspezial.com/public-art-competition-for-brunswick-center-scarborough/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/public-art-competition-for-brunswick-center-scarborough/ Brunswick owner Scarborough Group International has teamed up with Scarborough TEC to launch a design competition it hopes will inspire a new public art installation at the centre. The “Bolder Brunswick” competition invites art students in grades two and three at Scarborough TEC to submit designs for a large-scale work of art that captures the […]]]>

Brunswick owner Scarborough Group International has teamed up with Scarborough TEC to launch a design competition it hopes will inspire a new public art installation at the centre.

The “Bolder Brunswick” competition invites art students in grades two and three at Scarborough TEC to submit designs for a large-scale work of art that captures the essence of downtown’s past, present and future. city ​​of Scarborough to appear above the main entrance. in Brunswick.

Scott McCabe, SGI Group Director, commented:

“As a business, we are extremely passionate about supporting our local communities and strive to develop talent where possible, so teaming up with Scarborough TEC to identify ideas for how we can enliven the Entering Brunswick and improving the experience of our visitors made perfect sense.

“I look forward to reviewing the entries and finally seeing the winning artwork come to life and be displayed in a prominent place for all to enjoy for many years to come.”

Simon Gummerson, Senior Partner at Scarborough TEC, commented:

“This is a fantastic opportunity for our students to take part in a large-scale project that will not only allow them to showcase their work within the local community, but also potentially allow them to add value to a major attraction. from downtown, and we’re extremely grateful to Scarborough Group International for providing them with the platform to do this.

The finished designs will be featured in an exhibition in Brunswick that will be open to the public beginning April 25, 2022, with judging scheduled to take place May 6, 2022.

Submissions will be judged by a panel of local stakeholders, including the MP for Scarborough and Whitby, the Right Honorable Sir Robert Goodwill; Janet Deacon, Head of Tourism and Culture at Scarborough Borough Council; Zoe Aldcroft, Scarborough rugby star and 2021 World Rugby Women’s 15s Player of the Year; Scarborough News editor Steve Bambridge; Associate Director at Scarborough TEC, Simon Gummerson; SGI Group Director, Scott McCabe; and Brunswick Center Director Stephen Marriott.

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The Art Appreciation Society is here to demystify art – The New Indian Express https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art-the-new-indian-express/ As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and […]]]>


As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and cultural heritage, and Arjun Guleria, co-founder of the design and communication agency. , Beam & Words.

Growing up with parents who were art collectors, Savara was exposed to the art world from an early age. The holidays have always revolved around culturally stimulating experiences in museums and galleries, and she credits them to her continued interest over the years. “When you’re surrounded by something of great ferocity and intensity, it’s inevitable to fall in love with it,” she says. With a law degree in hand, she was able to combine her two skills by initiating a practice in art law in a leading law firm. As a lawyer in art, antiques and cultural heritage, she rejoices in the belief that while she cannot create art, she can at least protect it.

Guleria, on the other hand, had no previous exposure to this area and was presented there by Savara, whom he has accompanied to art exhibitions over the years. His inexperience sparked conversations about the intimidating nature of the fine art, one that instilled a fear of judgment in asking the wrong questions or not knowing who to ask. They soon realized that there were many more like Guleria, of all ages and genders, who had a desire to explore this world but didn’t know how or where to start. This awareness led to the birth of TAAS, to make art accessible and encourage inclusiveness. By initiating conversations and questions, organizing guided tours of art exhibitions, organizing workshops led by experts and artists, as well as technical and theoretical series, they attract an interested audience of people inclined to the creation of all walks of life.

Arjun Guleria and Tejshree Savara

Bhavna Kakar, founder of Gallery Latitude 28, appreciates the knowledgeable and interested audience they attract – an audience that appreciates the experience, asks the right questions and comes back for more. Lifestyle brand writer and blogger Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap, a regular attendee of TAAS events, attributes their appeal to the immersive experience they provide by encouraging constant organic dialogue between audiences. Lively conversations, facilitated by dynamic conservatives like Shaunak Mahbubani, are the main reason litigation lawyer Arjun Narayan frequents these events.


Take away food
✥ Tejshree Savara brings knowledge of art, Arjun Guleria creates conversation around events
✥ They prefer to work with young and dynamic people who are known to create engaging and meaningful conversations around art
Events are free
Events and promotions are run entirely by volunteers
✥ They plan to include intangible works of art in the future – music, dance, film, among other mediums
✥ We can keep up to date with the latest news of their events via their Instagram page @theartappreciationsociety


Although Covid-19 has been a spoiler by causing many last-minute event cancellations, the number of attendees at TAAS events has increased dramatically. Most importantly, the art fraternity takes note of these young enthusiasts and future collectors. A recent collaboration took place with Terrain.art, the world’s first blockchain-based art ecosystem in India, who reached out to them after hearing about their work. At the end of September, an engaged group of about 20 participants took part in a curator-led guided tour and artist interaction at Bikaner House in Delhi, where over 100 works of art by 35 artists through mediums AI paint was presented.

Their first contact with digital art, Savara shares: “It’s really fascinating to explore and understand NFT / Crypto art and since this is a very recent art offering it would be even more interesting to see what direction this will take over the next few years! “

Despite many challenges, TAAS has gained a foothold in the esoteric ecosystem, with exciting plans for expansion and growth. Guleria sums it up best when he says: “I don’t think you can ever claim to know enough about the art world. And that, in my experience, holds true for almost anything you are passionate about. TAAS events are currently free.


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The Art Appreciation Society is here to demystify art https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 07:44:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art/ As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and […]]]>


As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and cultural heritage, and Arjun Guleria, co-founder of the design and communication agency. , Beam & Words.

Growing up with parents who were art collectors, Savara was exposed to the art world from an early age. The holidays have always revolved around culturally stimulating experiences in museums and galleries, and she credits them to her continued interest over the years. “When you are surrounded by something of great ferocity and intensity, it is inevitable to fall in love with it,” she says. With a law degree in hand, she was able to combine her two skills by initiating a practice in art law in a leading law firm. As a lawyer specializing in art, antiques and cultural heritage, she rejoices in the belief that while she cannot create art, she can at least protect it.

Guleria, on the other hand, had no previous exposure to this area and was presented there by Savara, whom he has accompanied to art exhibitions over the years. His inexperience sparked conversations about the intimidating nature of the fine art, one that instilled a fear of judgment in asking the wrong questions or not knowing who to ask. They soon realized that there were many more like Guleria, of all ages and genders, who had a desire to explore this world but didn’t know how or where to start. This awareness led to the birth of TAAS, to make art accessible and encourage inclusiveness. By initiating conversations and questions, organizing guided tours of art exhibitions, organizing workshops led by experts and artists, as well as technical and theoretical series, they attract an interested audience of people inclined to the creation of all walks of life.

Bhavna Kakar, founder of Gallery Latitude 28, appreciates the knowledgeable and interested audience they attract – an audience that appreciates the experience, asks the right questions and comes back for more. Lifestyle brand writer and blogger Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap, a regular attendee of TAAS events, attributes their appeal to the immersive experience they provide by encouraging constant organic dialogue between audiences. Lively conversations, facilitated by dynamic conservatives like Shaunak Mahbubani, are the main reason litigation lawyer Arjun Narayan frequents these events.


Take away food
✥ Tejshree Savara brings knowledge of art, Arjun Guleria creates conversation around events
✥ They prefer to work with young and dynamic people who are known to create engaging and meaningful conversations around art
Events are free
Events and promotions are run entirely by volunteers
✥ They plan to include intangible works of art in the future – music, dance, cinema, among other mediums
✥ We can keep up to date with the latest news of their events via their Instagram page @theartappreciationsociety


Although Covid-19 has been a spoiler by causing many last-minute event cancellations, the number of attendees at TAAS events has increased dramatically. Most importantly, the art fraternity takes note of these young enthusiasts and future collectors. A recent collaboration took place with Terrain.art, the world’s first blockchain-based art ecosystem in India, who reached out to them after hearing about their work. At the end of September, an engaged group of about 20 participants took part in a curator-led guided tour and artist interaction at Bikaner House in Delhi, where over 100 works of art by 35 artists through mediums AI paint was presented.

Their first contact with digital art, Savara shares: “It’s really fascinating to explore and understand NFT / Crypto art and since this is a very recent art offering it would be even more interesting to see what direction this will take over the next few years! “

Despite many challenges, TAAS has gained a foothold in the esoteric ecosystem, with exciting plans for expansion and growth. Guleria sums it up best when he says: “I don’t think you can ever claim to know enough about the art world. And that, in my experience, holds true for almost anything you are passionate about. TAAS events are currently free.


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Daniel Buren takes the French presidential palace with the latest works of art – WWD https://jeanspezial.com/daniel-buren-takes-the-french-presidential-palace-with-the-latest-works-of-art-wwd/ https://jeanspezial.com/daniel-buren-takes-the-french-presidential-palace-with-the-latest-works-of-art-wwd/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/daniel-buren-takes-the-french-presidential-palace-with-the-latest-works-of-art-wwd/ PARIS – Daniel Buren caused a scandal by installing 260 striped columns in the courtyard of the Palais-Royal in 1986. Imagine what his detractors will say when they get wind of the artist’s latest project: to cover the glass roof of the reception rooms of the presidential palace. in panels of blue, white and red. […]]]>


PARIS – Daniel Buren caused a scandal by installing 260 striped columns in the courtyard of the Palais-Royal in 1986. Imagine what his detractors will say when they get wind of the artist’s latest project: to cover the glass roof of the reception rooms of the presidential palace. in panels of blue, white and red.

French President Emmanuel Macron unveiled the work at the Élysée on Monday in front of heavyweights from the art world, including Jean-Paul Claverie, advisor to Bernard Arnault and one of the main actors of the Louis Vuitton Foundation; Guillaume Houzé, president of Lafayette Anticipations, the art foundation supported by the Galeries Lafayette Group, and gallery owner Kamel Mennour, among others.

Macron said the works, a “flight of fancy”, were symbolic of the new spirit of freedom sweeping the country, more than three months after the reopening of museums, theaters and cinemas following an extended closure due to of the coronavirus pandemic.

“At a time when life is resuming, this work of art reflects a desire not only to make the Élysée Palace a place of contemporary creation, but to invite you all to share in the spirit of daring, freedom and of reinventing our country, because I believe that this is fundamentally the role of artists, ”said Macron.

It comes as the city comes alive around the envelopment of the Arc de Triomphe for a posthumous installation by the artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude, and the opening of several major exhibitions, including “The Morozov Collection. Icons of Modern Art ”at the Louis Vuitton Foundation.

French President Emmanuel Macron, artist Daniel Buren and designer Ora Ito inaugurate the exhibition “Pavoisé: travail in situ” by artist Daniel Buren at the Elysée Palace in Paris.
Gonzalo Fuentes / Pool photo via AP

Entitled “Pavoisé”, a reference to the placing of banners and flags, Buren’s work is to be unveiled to the public during European Heritage Days on September 18 and 19, and will remain on display until at least February 2022.

The artist, who was introduced to Macron by designer Ora Ito, added a wall of mirrors at the back of the winter garden which, along with the adjoining ballroom and the Napoleon III room, was renovated in 2019 by the interior designer Isabelle Stanislas, under the direction of La Première Dame Brigitte Macron, to give it a more airy and contemporary look.

Multicolored panels, inspired by the French national flag, create a kaleidoscope of colorful light beams in the reception area. Buren left an empty space between each tricolor section in order to give a glimpse of the sky beyond the canopy.

“This is probably the first and the last time that I will use the colors of the French flag,” he said. “I was a little hesitant, because I don’t like playing with recognizable symbols too much, but I thought to myself that if I don’t do it here, I never will… This is the heart of the French Republic . “

Still, don’t count on him to feel too respectful to disrupt the halls of power. “I don’t care if I work in a bathroom or in a historic monument,” he said. “I’m not cynical, but for me this place is the same as every other place I have been invited to work.”

Among the guests were filmmaker Farida Khelfa, founder and editor-in-chief of Numero Babeth Djian, founder of Just an Idea Sarah Andelman, Minister of Culture Roselyne Bachelot and her predecessor Jack Lang, who gave the green light to the Columns. de Buren at the Palais-Royal in the 1980s.

The artist said he didn’t relish the controversy over his works. “I don’t intend to provoke that kind of reaction, especially when it’s very negative,” he said. But he doesn’t want to be considered an official artist either. “Every time someone uses this term it has a negative connotation,” he remarked.

The "Pavoisé" work of art by artist Daniel Buren at the Elysée Palace in Paris.

The work “Pavoisé” by artist Daniel Buren at the Palais de l’Élysée in Paris.
Stéphane Aboudaram / We Are Content (s) / Courtesy of the Elysée Palace

On the contrary, Buren wants his works to blend into the landscape, to the point of becoming indistinguishable from their surroundings, as was the case with the installation of the Palais-Royal almost 40 years later.

“These works are not transferable anywhere else, so if they stay in place for a long time, they end up blending into the place. If they stay for a short time, they will have a more temporary effect, but in both cases, I think something interesting is happening between work and place, which become inseparable, ”he said. declared.

Buren said he hoped “Pavoisé” would stay in place indefinitely, although he was aware that next year’s presidential elections could usher in a new tenant. “I can imagine that if the president is not re-elected, there is a chance that the next one gets rid of him,” he said.

SEE ALSO:

Artist Daniel Buren gives a touch of color to the Louis Vuitton Foundation

François Pinault’s Parisian museum is finally ready for its close-up

Martin Margiela art exhibition in Paris postponed to fall


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Amsterdam council to return 20 million euros in works of art to family of former Jewish owners https://jeanspezial.com/amsterdam-council-to-return-20-million-euros-in-works-of-art-to-family-of-former-jewish-owners/ https://jeanspezial.com/amsterdam-council-to-return-20-million-euros-in-works-of-art-to-family-of-former-jewish-owners/#respond Sun, 29 Aug 2021 14:51:05 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/amsterdam-council-to-return-20-million-euros-in-works-of-art-to-family-of-former-jewish-owners/ A nine-year legal battle that turned the international art world upside down unexpectedly ended with the Amsterdam City Council’s decision to unilaterally return a 20 million euro work of art by Wassily Kandinsky to the family of its former Jewish owners. The council’s decision runs counter to a decision by the Netherlands Restitution Commission in […]]]>


A nine-year legal battle that turned the international art world upside down unexpectedly ended with the Amsterdam City Council’s decision to unilaterally return a 20 million euro work of art by Wassily Kandinsky to the family of its former Jewish owners.

The council’s decision runs counter to a decision by the Netherlands Restitution Commission in 2018 that the Stedelijk Municipal Museum of Modern Art could keep the painting because it was purchased “in good faith” in October 1940 and was of “great historical interest in art”. value”.

The case was seen as a litmus test for the moral authority of the commission – which was established to deal with claims regarding works of art confiscated or looted during the Nazi occupation – and whose ruling in the case Kandinsky was confirmed by an Amsterdam court last year.

Plaintiffs in the case – who have not been publicly named – said the owners of the pre-war painting, Robert Lewenstein and his wife Irma Klein, were forced to sell it “under duress” because their tailoring factory in Amsterdam was no longer viable under occupation.

Their lawyers pointed out during the case that the 160 guilders paid by the Stedelijk Museum to buy the work at auction represented only 30% of the 500 guilders that Mr. Lewenstein’s father, Emmanuel Lewenstein, had initially paid in 1923. .

They also noted that the World Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany considered the painting to be stolen.

However, rather than end the controversy, the court’s decision sparked an outcry and opened a new chapter in the controversial story of “bild mit hausern” or “painting with houses”, completed by the Russian artist in 1909 while studying in Munich.

A spokesperson for the plaintiffs called the judgment a “second plunder of the painting”, adding that “the first was issued by the Nazis and the second by the Dutch Restitution Commission, now in collaboration with the Amsterdam City Court” .

Principle

The influential former Home Minister, Jacob Kohnstamm, called the two decisions “unfair in principle” because it was unacceptable to take the interests of museums into account when returning looted works of art.

He was supported by Culture Minister Ingrid van Engelshoven, who said public expectations had changed. Preserving works of art on the basis of their cultural significance was no longer acceptable. What was needed instead was “restorative justice”.

Two members of the restitution commission have resigned.

Faced with the prospect of an appeal against last year’s court ruling, Amsterdam Mayor Femke Halsema made it clear what the bright side of the story was and wrote to the city council last Friday for him say that the work would be returned immediately.

The decision was made, she said, because of the time that has passed and “in the interest of righting the wrongs.”


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Shona Craven: Spreading Legs Artwork Had No Place In A Public Park https://jeanspezial.com/shona-craven-spreading-legs-artwork-had-no-place-in-a-public-park/ https://jeanspezial.com/shona-craven-spreading-legs-artwork-had-no-place-in-a-public-park/#respond Fri, 20 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/shona-craven-spreading-legs-artwork-had-no-place-in-a-public-park/ WHEN I saw on social media that a pair of flared legs appeared at the gates of my local park, at first I was sure it must have been a mistake. Surely it couldn’t be my local park, I thought, because this park didn’t even have doors, is not it? In all the years that […]]]>


WHEN I saw on social media that a pair of flared legs appeared at the gates of my local park, at first I was sure it must have been a mistake. Surely it couldn’t be my local park, I thought, because this park didn’t even have doors, is not it?

In all the years that I spent walking, running and lounging in this little park, I never paid attention to the doors because they are never closed. It is the last trace of the legendary Glasgow Garden Festival of 1988, and although it is no longer quite the hidden gem it used to be – the pond has dried up and the heron is gone – it is still enjoyed by the small number of residents who use it in the morning. , noon and night.

Last week, the gates were half closed: to better show the roughly rendered appendages attached to them. Even if my thorns hadn’t already been raised by the questionable nature of art, I would have been irritated to see this.

READ MORE: Art installation of a woman’s open legs removed from the gates of Glasgow Park

Public parks are for everyone which made it seem like access could be restricted or the park could be used for a special event. No explanatory information was provided on the artwork; not so much as a QR code to help explain that it was part of an intervention called “A Safari of All Kinds”. Perhaps it was just as well, given subsequent revelations about the artist’s intentions.

But the half-closing of the doors troubled me. I was struck by how easily a malicious person could close the other door behind him and push both locks through holes in the floor. Exit points count. They are especially important for women who use public parks.

These thoughts were particularly close to my mind because earlier this year a man appeared in court for raping an 18-year-old woman in the park. Surprisingly, it appeared that the artist behind the work was aware of this when she decided that a depiction of legs spread was suitable for this site-specific installation. Rakel McMahon says he has carried out “research in the field in particular with regard to the safety of women”.

Asked on Instagram about the thinking behind the art, she said she was aware that “this could be interpreted (sic) as sexist” but was meant to challenge assumptions. “Work is two legs in high heels, are they women? She wrote: “I think the work touches the discourse on blaming victims in sexual harassment and gives the park a feminine vibe that these green spaces need.”

Sorry, What?

Leaving aside the question of whether this piece adds to the “discourse” in any way, why the hell should a public park be given a “feminine vibe”? What is so un-feminine about the grass, the trees, the birds and the insects? Is the sky masculine? Are park benches? Gies peace.

Considering the almost endless array of contexts in which women experience sexual harassment, how about giving us a chance to avoid ‘touching the speech’ for a few minutes while taking a gentle walk, doing an invigorating jog or sitting on a bench with a book?

Men’s interests and concerns might currently drive the “feminism” of some misguided people, but I would venture to suggest that few members of the public in the park in Cessnock would have looked at a pair of legs spread wide, framing an elliptical hole. . in the ironwork of the door, and I thought “I really have to question my assumptions about gender.” Instead, many have rightly asked “why the hell was someone allowed to tie this rape art installation to the gates of a public park?” ”

The answer, it turns out, was that they weren’t. Glasgow City Council said it was unaware of the artistic “safari” and did not allow its park to host it. Shortly after local councilors were made aware of objections to McMahon’s article, it was withdrawn.

READ MORE: ‘We feel cheated’: Glasgow School of Art students launch legal action offer

Ltd Ink Corporation, the arts organization behind it, still features a photo of the installation on its Instagram account and has ignored comments asking questions about it. The group’s website notes that because it is privately funded, it can “take more risks” while promising to “engage with the public in a personal and intimate way.”

I wouldn’t question my own assumptions if I mentioned that at least four of the six people who run it have male names, but I have to say I don’t look forward to the next time they decide to take risks in engaging with me and my neighbors in an intimate way.

I expect them to make their own assumptions – for example, that anyone who opposes this particular work of art is a salutary-faced Philistine who does not deserve a response from the avant-garde guardians. , risky and male-dominated contemporary art.

But wouldn’t “the talk” win if this stooshie was used as a jumping off point for a conversation about sexual harassment and the public space? Or on artistic freedoms against the constraints of bureaucratic case-ticking? I would certainly be interested to hear it. The question is, do those who commissioned the piece have the balls to defend it publicly?


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“Artwork in the Age of Biotechnology” presents the interaction of science and art https://jeanspezial.com/artwork-in-the-age-of-biotechnology-presents-the-interaction-of-science-and-art/ https://jeanspezial.com/artwork-in-the-age-of-biotechnology-presents-the-interaction-of-science-and-art/#respond Fri, 02 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/artwork-in-the-age-of-biotechnology-presents-the-interaction-of-science-and-art/ Bombed by flashing pop-ups and glowing word art, viewers see an endless plethora of products from the Estroworld, which alludes to the materialist consumerist culture. Artist Mary Maggic combined their interests in body and gender politics, biohacking and environmental activism to create “Estroworld”, an interactive website featured at the online exhibition of “The work of […]]]>


Bombed by flashing pop-ups and glowing word art, viewers see an endless plethora of products from the Estroworld, which alludes to the materialist consumerist culture.

Artist Mary Maggic combined their interests in body and gender politics, biohacking and environmental activism to create “Estroworld”, an interactive website featured at the online exhibition of “The work of art in the age of biotechnology.The exhibition showcases the work of 10 artists from around the world, focusing on the roles that artists and scientists can play in shaping our genetic future.

With programming scheduled until Wednesday, organizers invite the Pitt community to explore not only the digital pieces, but also to interact with the artists behind them. Hannah Rogers, curator of the exhibition and visiting scholar at Pitt, said the exhibition aimed to introduce a new way of thinking about biotechnology.

Biotechnology is any technology based on biology. Scientists use biotechnology in different contexts, such as the genetic manipulation of microorganisms to produce drugs and devices. While biotechnology has seemingly inevitable consequences – from the exploitation of intellectual property to the loss of biodiversity – Rogers said the exhibition approaches the term in a more open way.

“A lot of times when we think about what biotechnology is, we think about it in a deterministic way – you know, that’s what’s going to happen and you don’t really have a choice,” Rogers said. “There are digital things in this world that suggest we are all trapped inside. But this is not really true.

Rogers said that just as we can choose the works of art we want to see in our daily lives, we can also choose the science we want to interact with.

“[Biotechnologies are] available to individuals and our society, but we can make choices about them, ”said Rogers. “And so these [pieces] are works that really aim to suggest to people what those possibilities are and alternate paths we might be able to take if we don’t like how things are.

But Rogers encourages viewers to also criticize how technologies develop, who develops them, and who has access to them. While looking for artists to feature, Rogers said she was looking for people already active in biotech and art.

“You need considerable time and experience to understand life sciences before you can really create this kind of work,” Rogers said. “We’re not just interested in a representation that someone doing digital work might be able to create an audio or visual piece for us. We really wanted someone who cares about biotechnology issues and is critical of what’s possible.

The Genomic Gastronomy Center is a collaborative research hub that has played with the idea of ​​food crops and biotechnology over the past decade. While there may not be a physical seat, his piece in the exhibit, titled Biotechnology crops, brings the Center to life.

Producer Emma Conley worked on the script and communicated with the programmer on how their ideas should be displayed.
“It’s like building in this very imaginative way, where the building has this big terraced roof with a lot of different food carts that we actually made,” Conley said. “We figured we were going to put them all together in one place where you could explore and eat from 15 different food carts that all tell different stories about the food system.”

The Center has criticized what is possible over the past decade – as molecular gastronomy was in vogue as a new way of preparing food, the Center decided to form a collaborative research hub to overthrow molecular gastronomy.

“Molecular gastronomy is all about bringing ingredients down to their most basic levels, dealing with a lot of chemistry, and reconstructing them to create new taste texture experiences,” said Conley. “With genomic gastronomy, we kind of wanted to ask the opposite question: What is it like trying to put an entire food system on a plate? “

Conley and his team study the genes of an organism and its environment and how these two relate to each other, looking at an entire food system, figuring out how to put it on a plate and serve it as a dish.

Their piece, titled “Cultures of Biotech”, is conceived from a second person perspective. Choosing between three characters, visitors enter the Center and experience a digital dinner. This mimics an actual series that the Center holds twice a year called the “Planetary Sculpture Supper Club”.

“The promise is that as eaters, we select foods not only to eat but also to raise,” Conley said. “In turn, this kind of sculpts the planet. Each part of your placemat tells a little bit about the story of each of the classes that you will discover.

Marie maggie is another artist who works at the intersection of biotechnology and art. An alumnus of Carnegie Mellon University, they were introduced to the world of bioart and biohacking by Professor Rich Pell, who also runs the Postnatural History Center at CMU.

In 2015, Maggic co-initiated “Open Source Estrogen», A project that combined their interests in body and gender politics, environmental activism and biohacking. Maggic said their goal has always been to “open the ‘black box'”.

“With all of my work, there has always been a need to uncover or excavate – opening the ‘black box’ as they say in hacker communities,” said Maggic. “With hormones, it’s the same thing – I’m trying to understand how the binary gender has become codified by molecules, and how the same molecules, often intentionally hidden by capitalist interests, modify these same definitions of the binary gender. “

Maggic said they saw the virtual exhibit as an opportunity to create an online piece of art that they wanted to create but didn’t necessarily have the coding skills to execute it.

“Users are bombarded with a ton of flashing pop-ups that show products sold and depicted in Estroworld – a disturbing and imperceptible hyperobject of industrial pollution that is our inescapable harsh reality,” Maggic said. “Pop-ups just seem like a must-have, even when users dismiss pop-ups or try to close them, more pops up in seconds. “

According to Maggic, the constant flow of must-have pop-ups is similar to how no one – not even non-humans – can avoid exposure to “the residue of industrial capitalism.”


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Why Jack Dorsey’s very first tweet is a work of art https://jeanspezial.com/why-jack-dorseys-very-first-tweet-is-a-work-of-art/ https://jeanspezial.com/why-jack-dorseys-very-first-tweet-is-a-work-of-art/#respond Thu, 25 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/why-jack-dorseys-very-first-tweet-is-a-work-of-art/ The Mona Lisa has the highest insurance value ever for a painting. But the Mona Lisa postcard copy you bought in the Louvre boutique is barely worth the paper it’s printed on. Botticelli’s Primavera draws crowds of tourists to Florence’s Uffizi Gallery, but no one rushes home with a selfie stick to look at the […]]]>


The Mona Lisa has the highest insurance value ever for a painting. But the Mona Lisa postcard copy you bought in the Louvre boutique is barely worth the paper it’s printed on. Botticelli’s Primavera draws crowds of tourists to Florence’s Uffizi Gallery, but no one rushes home with a selfie stick to look at the version you ordered from Amazon. Why is that?

These questions have long plagued art theorists. It was first of all the advent of printing, which enabled us to produce books in series; then the cameras arrived; then the early music recording technology in the late 1800s; then social media platforms like Twitter and Instagram. All of these developments have allowed us to reproduce and share art on a large scale. But somehow, the value of the originals persists: An Instagram post from Guernica is no substitute for the real thing.

The philosopher Walter Benjamin reflected on this in his prophetic essay, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, 1935. He believes that the appeal of an original object boils down to an “aura” (how New Age !). What he tries to describe is an ineffable quality of the work which can only be experienced in its original form; a transcendent beauty that he holds; and the hallmark it derives from surviving as a historical artifact.

This is fantastic news for the hyper-exclusive, elitist art world that only exists thanks to exorbitantly priced (and over-inflated) works of art. If the reproductions lowered the value of the paintings they sell, Instagram would have killed their racketeering in the blink of an eye.

But these questions – which go to the heart of what art is, why we care about it, and how we value it – have emerged with renewed urgency in recent months. There’s a little news that forces us to confront our unresolved questions about art and industry: non-fungible tokens (support me).

NFTs are basically proof of digital ownership of something, it can be anything: a video, a tweet, an animation. Think of it as a new method of collecting and buying art, except that art is not the kind you find on the walls of the National Gallery, but rather the kind of thing you find after you have probed the depths of Twitter.

It sounds confusing because it is. And the art world is struggling to keep up with this rapidly changing scene that threatens to upend the traditional ways in which art is bought, sold, and made. The very first tweet from Twitter founder Jack Dorsey was sold on Tuesday as NFT for $ 2.9 million (€ 2.4 million). The tweet reads: “I just configured my twttr. The buyer compared him to the Mona Lisa. And just a few weeks ago, the world’s most prestigious auction house, Christie’s, hosted its first-ever digital-only auction, with artist Beeple making $ 69 million (58.3 million dollars). ‘euros).

Why the hell would someone pay so much for a tweet? Even given the historical weight the tweet carries (something we shouldn’t so easily underestimate), it seems like a ridiculous use of money: you and I can still access the tweet whenever we want, we can. print it out and post it all over our walls if we were so inclined, we might even retweet it on our own calendars and save $ 2.9 million doing it. Buying the tweet appears to grant the buyer nothing but the right to brag about owning it.

But as mind-boggling and abstract as it all sounds, NFTs aren’t the first time this sort of thing has happened. In 2019, artist Maurizio Cattelan exhibited a banana duct glued to a wall. When the artwork was destroyed (actually eaten) in a waterfall, the gallery manager quickly assured everyone that nothing was really damaged. “He did not destroy the work of art. The banana is the idea, ”he said. The idea for this banana was sold to a collector for $ 120,000 (€ 101,000).

There is nothing more ridiculous about buying ownership of a tweet than buying the idea of ​​a banana, of course. NFTs are just hard to take into account because newer technologies seem intimidating and weird.

As for the banana and for the tweet, we should once again recall Benjamin’s words. The aura that accompanies the original form of something is a quality almost impossible to describe, but it is certainly there. Therefore, copies of paintings do little to undermine the value of the real thing; and why an original Gutenberg bible would cost you millions when the bible is the most printed and best-selling book in the world.

It is very easy to laugh at the absurdities of the art world. They probably deserve it. But what the NFTs have done is force us to consider something more about the fundamental importance of art: what do we love about it and why do we want to own it? If that’s all this latest development achieves, that will be a good thing.


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