high school – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 00:34:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jeanspezial.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png high school – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ 32 32 THE PINK UNICORN announced at ART Station in Stone Mountain, April 28 https://jeanspezial.com/the-pink-unicorn-announced-at-art-station-in-stone-mountain-april-28/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 00:34:35 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-pink-unicorn-announced-at-art-station-in-stone-mountain-april-28/ ART Station presents Out Front Theater Company’s production of this award-winning solo play. Kenna Redding plays Trisha, a Christian widow, who must choose between learning to provide for her child or maintaining the status quo in her conservative Texas town after her teenager comes out as “gender queer” and opens a chapter of the Gay […]]]>

ART Station presents Out Front Theater Company’s production of this award-winning solo play. Kenna Redding plays Trisha, a Christian widow, who must choose between learning to provide for her child or maintaining the status quo in her conservative Texas town after her teenager comes out as “gender queer” and opens a chapter of the Gay Straight Alliance at the local high school. With lively wit and humor, this rich and poetic story explores what it means to be a parent and advocate in these changing times.

Inspired by personal events experienced by playwright, Elise Forier Edie, the “powerful message of this brilliantly wise and inspiring work” (NY Theater Now) has touched audiences across the United States and Canada. After watching gay people being shunned and excluded from a local school and church, Edie explained that she started writing The Pink Unicorn “in an effort to deal with my anger and fear over these incidents.

What were these people so afraid of? Why would they twist logic and defy reason and even hurt their own children to prevent the harmless LGBTQ community from coming out and enjoying the rights of all other Americans? And what could I do about it? How could I change it? How could I make a difference?”

Masks are optional for fully vaccinated people and highly recommended for unvaccinated people. ART Station is closely monitoring the evolving situation and will continue to adjust policies in accordance with CDC guidelines and recommendations.

The Out Front Theater Company’s production of The Pink Unicorn, directed by Paul Conroy, will have performances Thursday, April 28, Friday, April 29, and Saturday, April 30 at 8:00 p.m., Saturday Matinee, May 1, at 3:00 p.m. All performances will be held at the ART Station Theater located at 5384 Manor Drive in Historic Stone Mountain Village 770-469-1105. artstation.org.

]]>
Student artwork is on display with a mural at the 2Max FM building https://jeanspezial.com/student-artwork-is-on-display-with-a-mural-at-the-2max-fm-building/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 04:01:37 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/student-artwork-is-on-display-with-a-mural-at-the-2max-fm-building/ Parkes MP Mark Coulton recently officially unveiled an impressive mural on the facade of the 2Max FM building in Narrabri. Readers may have noticed the colorful mural, which reflects the various attributes of the area. Images of cotton and sheep with spectacular sawn rocks. “This mural was created by three 8th graders from Narrabri High […]]]>

Parkes MP Mark Coulton recently officially unveiled an impressive mural on the facade of the 2Max FM building in Narrabri.

Readers may have noticed the colorful mural, which reflects the various attributes of the area.

Images of cotton and sheep with spectacular sawn rocks.

“This mural was created by three 8th graders from Narrabri High School, Isabella Keys, Samantha Westman and Caitlyn Taylor, whose design was chosen following a competition within the high school,” Coulton said. .

“The artwork is fantastic and perfectly captures Narrabri County, making it a welcoming entry for the local community radio station.”

The radio station’s vice president, Jeff Cloake, gave a short but thoughtful speech thanking the contributors.

Mr Cloake thanked Inland Rail for their “generous funding” and Mr Coulton for his “dedication to supporting community radio”.

“Thank you to Narrabri High School students Isabella, Samantha and Caitlyn for designing the artwork and Turner Signs for turning it into the exhibit you see today,” he said.

The artwork was made possible by a $2,984 grant for sponsorships and donations from the Inland Rail community and other eligible local groups and organizations were encouraged to apply for the grants.

Manager Cassie Boyd said 2Max FM applied for the grant to retrofit the facade of the community radio station building in May 2020, with the goal of encouraging input from Narrabri County youth.

2MaxFM approached Narrabri High School art teachers and discussed how the students could design the artwork for the mural.

Students were invited to submit their ideas to 2MaxFM, and the radio station then ran a Facebook promotion asking the community to vote for their favorite work.

The three most popular designs were presented to the 2MaxFM committee who made the final decision.

Due to COVID, the project took longer than originally planned, however, it is now fully displayed for the community to enjoy.

“It’s a wonderful sight to see the students’ artwork as you walk down Barwan Street,” said Ms. Boyd.

“We made sure to include the signatures of the students who designed the artwork, the high school crest and the Inland Rail logo to thank everyone involved in the project.

“2MaxFM would also like to acknowledge Inland Rail’s support of this project.”

To order photos from this page click here

]]>
Watch Now: Illinois Art Station to Expand Bloomington-Normal Programs for Spring | Arts and theater https://jeanspezial.com/watch-now-illinois-art-station-to-expand-bloomington-normal-programs-for-spring-arts-and-theater/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:30:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/watch-now-illinois-art-station-to-expand-bloomington-normal-programs-for-spring-arts-and-theater/ [ad_1] A nonprofit arts organization hopes to change lives through the arts. David proeber NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station is ready to welcome the children of Bloomington-Normal “home” where they can be messy and explore new means of expression through art. “I’m so excited to have people come and participate with us,” said Joey […]]]>


[ad_1]

A nonprofit arts organization hopes to change lives through the arts.



David proeber




NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station is ready to welcome the children of Bloomington-Normal “home” where they can be messy and explore new means of expression through art.

“I’m so excited to have people come and participate with us,” said Joey Hatch, education coordinator for the group. “Our goal is to do as much art with as many children as possible, so it’s very exciting to be able to have the opportunity to do that in our new building.”






The exterior of the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, in a wooded area near Constitution Trail is shown.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


The station, now in its first brick-and-mortar location at 101 E. Vernon Avenue in Normal, experienced a “slow opening” this fall, with some programs starting after the official opening in September. But this spring, educators are ready to go “deep” with expanded programs hosted at the new facility.

The non-profit organization, which has been providing artistic experiences for children and their families with mobile programs offered since 2018, had to embark on in-house programming in part because heavy summer rains pushed back the opening schedule. said Laura Jaster, executive director of the Illinois Art Station.






121521-blm-loc-1artstation

Laura Jaster, executive director of the Illinois Art Station, monitors the organization’s gallery at 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, Tuesday. Visit pantagraph.com to see a video with this story.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“We had a lot of ideas about what would happen, but the reality is always different and more interesting than your ideas,” she said. “It just gave us time to really get into space, inhabit it a bit before we went too far into anything.”

Now, the nonprofit is moving from having no facilities and just focusing on community outreach to bringing kids into studios and creative spaces.

Previously they were limited by what materials they could carry, but now “we’re able to make the mess and really get into the art and behind what kids want to do with their art,” Hatch said.






121521-blm-loc-3artstation

Supplies fill a studio at the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal. Four programs will be offered in the spring.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


Four core programs will be offered in spring 2022 in the form of three-week sessions depending on age groups.

“Itsy” is intended for children 3-5 years old as an early exploration. Their classes are held in the larger of IAS’s two studios, designed to allow children to mess around and even draw on tables, thanks to the surfaces of the whiteboard.

The “Art After 3 p.m.” classes are aimed at children ages 6 to 12, regarding exposure to new ideas, new artists, new materials and new techniques, Jaster said.

The college program, “smARTs Lab,” is at the intersection of different disciplines and this spring kids will focus on the arts and engineering.

High school students can participate in “Arts in Action” classes in which they address issues that concern them through art. Above the station stairs is an example of high school work: a globe created from plastic waste collected in a Bloomington park in partnership with the Ecology Action Center.






121521-blm-loc-4artstation

A unique hanging sculpture created by children from the Boys and Girls Club talks about the use of recycled plastics found in the environment. The sculpture hangs at the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“In all of our classes it’s really about them creating something that is close to their hearts and that is not like everything else,” Jaster said. “Usually, when they leave, nothing is alike. Even though they all use the same basic materials or the same basic inspiration, they all do something drastically different.

The art station is also expanding to include programming for homeschooled children in the Bloomington-Normal community, offering a six-week program focused on creative expression and skill development.

Every Saturday, drop-in hours are available from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., when kids can come and create without specific guidelines or limits – “to explore and play while creating,” Jaster said.






121521-blm-loc-5artstation

Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, is located in a wooded area next to Constitution Trail.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“At the end of the day, we want people to feel comfortable coming here, having fun and doing things, no matter where they’re from or where they’re from,” she said. declared. “Even if they’re not into art, I like to think they’ll find something really cool and enjoyable here. “

Because the IAS mission is to reach as many children as possible and involve them in creation, the station also offers scholarships for classes and programs, and Jaster said she would keep trying. meet children where they are through community partnerships.

Contact Kelsey Watznauer at (309) 820-3254. Follow her on Twitter: @kwatznauer.

[ad_2]

]]>
Student Christmas artwork adorns business windows – Chemainus Valley Courier https://jeanspezial.com/student-christmas-artwork-adorns-business-windows-chemainus-valley-courier/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 20:25:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/student-christmas-artwork-adorns-business-windows-chemainus-valley-courier/ [ad_1] Art was the perfect opportunity for the students of Chemainus High School to deploy their talents beyond the classroom and into the community to spread the joy of Christmas. Students working with art teacher Rhona Kane went out for two days last week and again on Monday to dress up some of the windows […]]]>


[ad_1]

Art was the perfect opportunity for the students of Chemainus High School to deploy their talents beyond the classroom and into the community to spread the joy of Christmas.

Students working with art teacher Rhona Kane went out for two days last week and again on Monday to dress up some of the windows of businesses around Chemainus as a gesture of kindness and positive action during the holiday season.

The idea arose out of Principal Lori Hryniuk’s desire for the community at large to see the artistic abilities of the students reflected in their work within the school.

“She thought we did such a good job there that we could take it out to the community and do something good for everyone,” Kane said.

“This is great news for the youth in our community,” said Hryniuk.

“I contacted (the president) Chris Istace and he got me into the Chemainus Business Association and it started from there.”

“They then emailed all the companies on our behalf,” Kane added.

One company, By The Bay Lavender, even offered an in-kind donation as a thank you.

“We had about 11 companies that wanted to do this,” Kane said. “We didn’t have enough time to hang out with everyone, but we did our best.”

As the students did the work on site, “everyone who passed was just in awe of what they were doing,” Kane observed. “You could really see the community coming together. “

“It was fun,” said Crimson McClellan, a grade 12 art student. “We were able to go out into the community, meet nice people. I don’t go out very often to Chemainus because I come from Thetis (island).

“Painting the interior is awesome. We would draw it freehand or with a stencil and place it against the window. Shopkeepers loved it, really grateful for all the decorations.

“It was nice to discover the Chemainus center,” added Sarah Ladot, a grade 12 international student from Belgium. “It was nice to use different techniques with paint, pen, different colors. I have never done that.

The students have previously teamed up for a competition to determine the best Christmas artwork in the school. Ashley Loeffen, Laura Rundquist and James Bélanger were the overwhelming winners in a school vote for their Winter Wonderland exhibit.

Now that the school has diversified, there is a desire to start over.

“It worked so well,” Kane said. “With more time it will be bigger and better.”

Christmas Art

The decorative art of Santa Claus welcomes visitors to the Beyond the Usual store in downtown Chemainus. (Photo by Don Bodger)

Christmas art in the display window of the Chemainus health food store.  (Photo by Don Bodger)

Christmas art in the display window of the Chemainus health food store. (Photo by Don Bodger)

The Winter Wonderland display won in the school for the best decorated Christmas window.  Members of the winning team, from left to right, were: Laura Rundquist, James Belanger and Ashley Loeffen.  (Photo by Rhona Kane)

The Winter Wonderland display won in the school for the best decorated Christmas window. Members of the winning team, from left to right, were: Laura Rundquist, James Belanger and Ashley Loeffen. (Photo by Rhona Kane)

Work on the By The Bay Lavender window was done, from left to right, by: Cora Haine, Chloe Junck and Rachel Halbot.  (Photo by Rhona Kane)

Work on the By The Bay Lavender window was done, from left to right, by: Cora Haine, Chloe Junck and Rachel Halbot. (Photo by Rhona Kane)

The old Kinney Clothing Co. window art piece is attributed, left to right, to: Sydney Wilson, Jade Reinsch and Litonya Louis.  (Photo by Rhona Kane)

The old Kinney Clothing Co. window art piece is attributed, left to right, to: Sydney Wilson, Jade Reinsch and Litonya Louis. (Photo by Rhona Kane)

Left to Right: Portia Duggan, Isabella Mason and Kaley Watts combine their window art talents at the Chemainus Theater Gallery gift shop.  (Photo by Rhona Kane)

Left to Right: Portia Duggan, Isabella Mason and Kaley Watts combine their window art talents at the Chemainus Theater Gallery gift shop. (Photo by Rhona Kane)

Left to Right: Sarah Ladot and Crimson McClellan on the display <a class=art scene at the Chemainus health food store. (Photo by Rhona Kane)” loading=”lazy” srcset=”https://3a0nh63bi31e2mggl320lr33-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/27503922_web1_211216-CHC-Christmas-window-art-done_5.jpeg 1200w, https://3a0nh63bi31e2mggl320lr33-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/27503922_web1_211216-CHC-Christmas-window-art-done_5-265×300.jpeg 265w, https://3a0nh63bi31e2mggl320lr33-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/27503922_web1_211216-CHC-Christmas-window-art-done_5-904×1024.jpeg 904w, https://3a0nh63bi31e2mggl320lr33-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/27503922_web1_211216-CHC-Christmas-window-art-done_5-768×870.jpeg 768w, https://3a0nh63bi31e2mggl320lr33-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/27503922_web1_211216-CHC-Christmas-window-art-done_5-640×725.jpeg 640w, https://3a0nh63bi31e2mggl320lr33-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/27503922_web1_211216-CHC-Christmas-window-art-done_5-1024×1161.jpeg 1024w” sizes=”(max-width: 320px) 93vw, (max-width: 639px) 97vw, (max-width: 1023px) 63vw, 640px”/>

Left to Right: Sarah Ladot and Crimson McClellan on the display art scene at the Chemainus health food store. (Photo by Rhona Kane)

[ad_2]

]]>
JISD Board of Trustees Rewards Four Elementary Students for Their Artistic Work https://jeanspezial.com/jisd-board-of-trustees-rewards-four-elementary-students-for-their-artistic-work/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 11:10:31 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/jisd-board-of-trustees-rewards-four-elementary-students-for-their-artistic-work/ [ad_1] At the regular meeting of the Jourdanton School Board, four elementary school students presented their works made during Jenna Bronstad’s art class. Each also gave information on the different media used and the many projects they carried out during the year. All students are in the Gifted and Talented class, also taught by Bronstad. […]]]>


[ad_1]

At the regular meeting of the Jourdanton School Board, four elementary school students presented their works made during Jenna Bronstad’s art class. Each also gave information on the different media used and the many projects they carried out during the year. All students are in the Gifted and Talented class, also taught by Bronstad. Pictured, left to right, Shaylee Edmiston, Brynn Schorsch, Sloane Schorsch and Rylan Edmiston. In the back are Principal Assistant Renee Royal, Principal Kim Camarillo and Teacher Jenna Bronstad. DIANA GUTHRIE | PLEASANTON EXPRESS

Elementary art students were recognized at the Monday night meeting of the Jourdanton School Board. Teacher Jenna Bronstad explained that her K-5 art classes experimented with different artistic mediums, such as oil pastels and watercolors. Each student introduced themselves and showed an example of their work. Shaylee Edmiston and Brynn Schorsch are in fifth year, Sloane Schorsch is in third year, and Rylan Edmiston is in fourth year. All four students are also enrolled in Bronstad’s Gifted and Talented program.

Jourdanton Education Foundation

Stephanie Collins, President of the Foundation, presented the trustees with last year’s annual report which included what they had done, how much money they had raised and how it had been spent. They raised over $ 57,000 and over $ 27,000 of that went back to school in the form of 14 grants. These funds were donated for math, social studies, world maps for junior high school history, outdoor play landscapes, science equipment, photography and for updating some farm equipment. . Fourteen thousand dollars was spent on the summer reading program and they spent $ 600 on gifts for new teachers. Another $ 7,000 was used for expenses including insurance, advertising and fundraising.

They are interested in repeating or expanding any program that has been proven to work. The organization is working with a grant writer to reach outside the region for donations, not wanting to put too much pressure on the community, which has been so generous. Their focus will be on STEM and literacy. The goal is to impact all students, provide them with a real-world experience to help them grow and help them be ready to work after graduation.

ALS Assessment

Assistant Superintendent Pepper Jo Bauerle reviewed the annual evaluation of the ESL program and the success of the students participating in it. Last year 3.1% of students were from ESL and 51.8% were from economically disadvantaged people. There are 44 students in the program, with one student who has passed the TELPAS assessment. There was no data for students last year due to COVID. Students are assessed on their ability to listen, speak and write. Kindergarten to Grade 5 had 28% beginners, 41% intermediate, 23% advanced, and 8% advanced high. Students in Grades 3 to 8 rated 6% Beginners, 35% Intermediate, 44% Advanced, and 15% Advanced Advanced. All state-certified ESL teachers receive a stipend of $ 1,000 and are required to complete professional development. The district receives $ 3,000 from Title III through Region 20, which was used to purchase Rosetta Stone for additional student aid. The state gives $ 21,275 and local funds $ 27,206.

Closed session

Administrators went behind closed doors at 7:47 p.m. to consult with a lawyer regarding the school’s dress code and to consider hiring a reading intervention teacher.

They returned at 9:08 p.m. No action has been taken regarding the dress code. The innovative teacher strategies as presented were endorsed by Nicole Rakowitz as a motion and Phillip Netardus in support. All voted for Vance Jupe, Rita Munoz, Celia Chapa and Greg Vyvlecka. President Barbara Peeler was present but did not vote. As recommended, they unanimously approved the hiring of Rhonda Lawson as a reading intervention teacher to bridge the education gap during COVID. She has been approved for a 2021-2022 professional contract which will be paid by ESSER (Federal Emergency Relief for Elementary and Secondary Schools) funds.

Consent agenda

Peeler read the business office report which shows a total investment of $ 13,254,575 and a monthly tax collection of $ 436,496.48. Checks issued for the month amounted to $ 369,979.28. A motion was made to approve the agenda, including the minutes of the last meeting and the payment of invoices. It was adopted unanimously.

New business

Payment of the conflict of interest invoices was approved, with Peeler and Vyvlecka abstaining.

A public hearing to discuss the district’s financial management report and the top rating by the Texas Financial Integrity Rating System was scheduled for 6 p.m. on Dec. 13, with the regular meeting starting immediately thereafter.

Superintendent Theresa McAllister has reviewed some of the provisions of the Open Meetings Act, which is done periodically. Certain questions arise concerning the number of directors at social meetings and what constitutes a quorum. If they’re not discussing business in public, that’s okay. A majority is also clarified as four out of seven or five out of nine, regardless of vacancies. Closed-door meetings can be arranged to discuss with a lawyer, personnel matters and the purchase of property.

The canvassing of the votes for the November 2 election was scheduled for Monday November 15 at 6.30 p.m. They will also reorganize the board at that time.

There was a discussion about buying a tractor with tools for the maintenance department. Several offers were received: John Deere, Bill’s Tractor and Kabota. The item was dropped off until they could get an offer from Tuttle as well.

Superintendent’s Report

McAllister announced that the group qualified for the state competition and did very well.

The school organized a Boofest, with around 190 parents in attendance. The guests dressed up as characters from books and read to the students. She expressed her appreciation for the community’s help and generosity for the event.

Additionally, she accepted Peggy Georg’s resignation and said they would likely be looking for an agriculture teacher in the spring.

Meeting adjourned at 9.40 p.m.

[ad_2]

]]>
DeKalb Graduate Artwork To Be Featured In Nationwide Digital Exhibition (Copy) | https://jeanspezial.com/dekalb-graduate-artwork-to-be-featured-in-nationwide-digital-exhibition-copy/ Wed, 18 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/dekalb-graduate-artwork-to-be-featured-in-nationwide-digital-exhibition-copy/ [ad_1] WATERLOO – The work of recent DeKalb High School graduate Oliver (Olivia) Benbow has been shortlisted for inclusion on the College Board AP National Gallery of Art and Design website. Benbow graduated from DeKalb in 2021 and now attends Purdue University in West Lafayette, where he is studying biochemistry. Benbow completed the piece as […]]]>


[ad_1]

WATERLOO – The work of recent DeKalb High School graduate Oliver (Olivia) Benbow has been shortlisted for inclusion on the College Board AP National Gallery of Art and Design website.

Benbow graduated from DeKalb in 2021 and now attends Purdue University in West Lafayette, where he is studying biochemistry. Benbow completed the piece as part of a portfolio for an AP studio art class at DeKalb.

His artwork was one of 50 pieces selected across the country for digital exhibition.

“This year’s exhibition features high-quality student artwork exploring creativity, innovation in artistic creation and thought, critical thinking through research, process and practice, and excellence in skills, ”the College Board explained of its selections.

“Basically it’s about having multiple identities in one body,” Benbow said of his article.

“This piece was part of a portfolio for AP art and design. Students had to come up with a question that guided their entire portfolio, ”said Jessica Minnich, art teacher at DeKalb High School.

Students also had to come up with a question that motivated each piece, Minnich added.

Benbow asked the question, “How do I bring trans and queer culture to my community through my plays?” »Leads his wallet.

“How can I show multiple gender identities in one person? Was the question that motivated the selected piece, said Benbow.

“I wanted to use different fashions and things that are attributed to trans culture and queer culture so I wanted to use things like ‘camp’ and fashion and different poses,” Benbow said.

He said his work featured “a lot of flamboyance” and took inspiration from history, such as the Elizabethan court dress for inspiration and ideas.

Benbow used pen and watercolor to create the piece.

“Oliver was probably one of my most prolific students of all time,” said Minnich, noting that Benbow completed five sketchbooks during the year.

“From front to back, every page is covered. They’re like masterpieces… people would stare at them for hours, ”Minnich said.

“He was so motivated. Everything was so awesome. He was always willing to try and experiment with many different mediums and colors. Everything was very expressive and very unique.

The website featuring digital signage is expected to launch later this fall.

[ad_2]

]]>
Students win $ 50,000 for rodeo artwork https://jeanspezial.com/students-win-50000-for-rodeo-artwork/ https://jeanspezial.com/students-win-50000-for-rodeo-artwork/#respond Thu, 24 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/students-win-50000-for-rodeo-artwork/ [ad_1] Three Cy-Fair ISD students took part in the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Art Program and won nearly $ 50,000 between them at the school art auction last month, a press release from the district said. Ravine Cohen, a student at Hamilton Middle School, received one of 120 Museum of Fine Arts scholarships at […]]]>


[ad_1]

Three Cy-Fair ISD students took part in the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo Art Program and won nearly $ 50,000 between them at the school art auction last month, a press release from the district said.

Ravine Cohen, a student at Hamilton Middle School, received one of 120 Museum of Fine Arts scholarships at Glassell Junior School of Art and won the Best of Show award. Cohen’s painting, “Sunkissed Stallions,” sold for $ 30,000.

Amy Muery, a junior from Jersey Village High School, sold her painting “Laying Hen” for $ 12,000 and won the gold medal in the high school division of the School Art Program.

Cypress Woods High School freshman Magdalena Baughman sold her work “Bridger & Pico” for $ 7,000 and took home the award for best performance in the Monochrome Drawing division.

-Contributed by Cy-Fair ISD

Student art will be featured in the Texas calendar

Students from Cy-Fair ISD elementary and secondary schools have been shortlisted for the 2022 Treasures of the Texas Coast Children’s Art Contest.

Alishia Yu, Sampson Elementary School Student, Rodrigo Cruz, Truitt Middle School Sixth Student, Gabriella Bartczak, Spillane Middle School Sixth Student, and Jordan Hemphill, School Sixth Student Goodson’s intermediary, were four of the 40 winners chosen for the contest. Their works will be included in the 2022 Treasures of the Texas Coast calendar.

“I would like to thank the art teachers at CFISD for encouraging their students to submit entries for the Treasures of the Texas Coast children’s art competition,” said Lee Carrier, visual arts coordinator for CFISD, in a statement. Press release. “With our community spending more time outdoors and on the beaches, this contest was a great activity for students to be aware of keeping their neighborhood and community clean. When CFISD students use their artistic talents to create environmental awareness, it is a laudable act to be recognized for and I am proud of the participating students and those who received an award.

-Contributed by Cy-Fair ISD

Graduates Receive TASSP Scholarships

Bridgeland High School Class 2021 graduates William Boucher and Reggie Bell have both won awards and scholarships from the Texas High School Principals Association for their academic performance.

Boucher received the $ 500 TASSP Teens Serving Texas Scholarship, recognizing seniors for their community service and leadership. Bell was named to the All-State Academic Excellence Team. Bell also received a $ 500 scholarship and was recognized for his SAT, GPA and Essays scores.

“We are so proud of Reggie and William,” said Traci Underwood, Bridgeland Director of Education, in a press release. “These two awards are a testament to the academic excellence and community involvement these Bears exemplified during their time in Bridgeland. To be recognized by TASSP is an extraordinary honor.

-Contributed by Cy-Fair ISD

College students win library research awards

Three students from Lone Star College-CyFair received the Student Research Award for nearly $ 1,000 in prizes for their honor class projects. All three were nominated by the faculty.

“Given the tremendous effort students put into their research, writing, and classroom presentation materials, this award goes one step further by recognizing the effectiveness with which students communicated information found in library books and online databases in their research projects, ”LSC-CyFair director of library services Susan Green, said in a press release LSC-CyFair. “We are very proud of the quality and the stimulating projects that our students produce each year. “

Large company Diana Tran won first place for her environmental science project “Creating a Cost-Benefit Analysis Guideline from Ecological Economics: How Can this be Applied to Landfill Mining? Joseph Flores won second place for his article in English “Submit to Sin: Contextualizing the Roman Empire in Augustine’s Detailing of Sexuality in Confessions”.

Major in Mechanical Engineering John Lentz won third place for his research project “The Moral Engineer: Applying Kantian Deontology to Engineering Ethics Within the Scope of Identity”.

“Seeing my research that I worked hard on and lost sleep on is very rewarding,” Lentz said. “Through the lessons learned and receiving this award, I not only gained confidence in my research skills, but I learned to love the research process. “

-Contributed by Lone Star College-CyFair

chevall.pryce@chron.com

[ad_2]

]]>
https://jeanspezial.com/students-win-50000-for-rodeo-artwork/feed/ 0
How many people does it take for art to work? https://jeanspezial.com/how-many-people-does-it-take-for-art-to-work/ https://jeanspezial.com/how-many-people-does-it-take-for-art-to-work/#respond Sun, 26 Apr 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/how-many-people-does-it-take-for-art-to-work/ [ad_1] It seemed strange to publish this story, which appears in the print version of issue 18 of GARAGE, about family, community and coworkers as living in quarantine has changed the way we interact with the world. (For the most part, those shoots couldn’t happen today.) We asked the artists to let us know where […]]]>


[ad_1]

It seemed strange to publish this story, which appears in the print version of issue 18 of GARAGE, about family, community and coworkers as living in quarantine has changed the way we interact with the world. (For the most part, those shoots couldn’t happen today.) We asked the artists to let us know where they are in quarantine, what their version of the community looks like now, and how quarantine has been. changed their process though at all. Their answers are below.

Tschabalala Self (right) poses with her partner, Mike Mosby, at her family’s home in Harlem, minutes from her New Haven studio.

Tschabalala Self
“When I’m in New Haven, I just work in my space, it’s a pretty lonely experience,” explains painter Tschabalala Self. She adds, “I don’t have a huge social life. I have my family, my four siblings, my boyfriend. She chose to have her photograph taken with him. After graduating from the Master of Fine Arts program at Yale in 2015, she saw her classmates gradually move from New Haven to cities that are more traditional artist-run centers – Brooklyn, Berlin, Los Angeles, etc. But Self decided to stay. , and eventually began to occupy the studios of his neighboring friends when they left. She now has enough space to make the increasingly ambitious collage canvases she’s known for, some of which will be on display this year at Eva Presenhuber’s New York outpost on Great Jones Street. (It’s not too bad a ride to Self – the gallery is just over two hours by train from New Haven.) She is also close to her merchants, with whom she often goes to various vernissages and exhibitions. As the demand for Self’s work continues to grow – his pieces have sold for nearly $ 500,000 at auction – this travel program will only increase.

“I am currently in quarantine in the Hudson Valley. My vision of the community is the same: I just look forward to the day and hour when I can once again have space within my community. My 40s have been very humiliating and I am even more grateful to my loved ones. I think everyone will remember who contacted them during this time. My 40s made me work slower and without a set goal in mind, which was liberating in some ways. The uncertainty and destruction caused by the virus has given me food for thought and inspires me to work harder to bring meaningful images to the world. “—April 23, 2020

1587740797166-Sam_000009760015

When an artist’s muses occupy the inaccessible rungs of fame, as in the case of painter Sam McKinniss, who poses alone in his studio, the subjects themselves can be his closest collaborators.

Sam McKinniss
At first, painter Sam McKinniss wanted to be photographed with a friend – “the guy I go to happy hour with most days of the week after work,” he said. “This is the angle of the community.” But after some thought, he decided to go it alone. And that makes sense, given that most of the 35-year-old subjects are iconic figures and moments so famous that they have a singular hold on our imaginations: Whitney Houston mid-belt, Prince on the gigantic motorcycle in Purple rain, Princess Diana desperate on a yacht in Portofino, and Joan Didion, her slender hands clasped. Most famous, he painted singer Lorde for the cover of her 2017 album, Melodrama, capturing her as she lay languidly in bed, artificial light streaming down her face. Most often, he paints from images he finds on Google. It is here, in this alchemy process, that the works transform into something much more than fan worship. The vaporous paints do not reproduce a celebrity so much as the idea of a celebrity, stained by the passage of time and altered by the weak prejudices of the spectator.

“I’m in quarantine at home or in the studio, both in Brooklyn. I live and work alone. There is no proper style of being in a community right now. I speak on the phone more often than before, which is good. And I got involved in a few projects to raise and donate funds for mutual aid, but it’s all networked through the phone, social media, or email. You could call it a community. But I’m done with Zoom, I hate it there. I used the HouseParty app once, but it stressed me out. I miss my friends. I slowed down again, a lot, because there is no point in hurrying. It’s been over a month, every day is the same. I take my time on some detailed photos. I lost the worry about speed, or having to follow our accelerated culture. We do not care? Culture has a lot to do with it. I watched Titanic a few times during quarantine, which seems relevant. The ship sinks at the end. —April 23, 2020

1587740834956-Bunnie_000006350022_V2

In November 2019, Bunny Rogers (center, ground) brought together artists and zombie friends, including writer Allese Thomson (front row, second from left) and podcast host Dasha Nekrasova (first row, in a pink dress).

Rogers Rabbit
Bunny Rogers wanted to be photographed alongside the performers who participated in her latest work, Sanctuary, staged last November during Performa 19. The play took place at Essex Street Academy on the Lower East Side, and had the chilling effect of reminiscent of a school shooting. She has long infused her work with references to the 1999 school shooting that killed 12 students and a teacher at Columbine High School in Colo. When Bunny was just nine years old. At 27, she had her first solo exhibition at the Whitney Museum in New York, Brig and ladder, which included an animated video titled A very special holiday show at the Columbine Auditorium, featuring a mix of characters from the animation Clone high sitcom, as well as Grizabella from Cats. There was also Colombine Library, a personal exhibition at the Société Berlin, and Colombine cafeteria, a solo exhibition at Greenspon in New York. But it was at Performa that she first brought her community into the fold and allowed them to work with her.

“[I’m quarantining in] New York. [My version of community right now consists of] my friends online, my friends on the phone. I have ups and downs. My motivation is down. I just try to take care of myself and the people I love. Of course, I still collect Disney licenses Little Mermaid merchandise. It will be useful someday. “—April 24, 2020

1587740878052-Nathaniel_000091820017

Both dressed in red, Nathaniel Mary Quinn and his wife, actress Donna Augustin-Quinn, stand with their friend Gardy St. Fleur (far left) and Gagosian Gallery director Ashley Stewart (at the far right) on the street near Quinn’s favorite cafe, Corner Moudre. Stewart wears jacket by HELMUT LANG

Nathaniel Mary Quinn
Nathaniel Mary Quinn doesn’t need a large group of people to help him while he’s at the studio. The Chicago native is only seeking the approval of one person: his wife, actress Donna Augustin-Quinn. Ever since he started making paintings – fabulous distorted representations of bodies, neo-Cubist explorations of the face – she has been his first viewer, sounding board and editor. “My wife sees everything I do, and I trust her judgment and evaluation, you know?” Quinn said. And her role isn’t just a casual support position: she’s officially Quinn’s studio director. “I don’t exactly have an assistant factory or anything of that nature… we run everything together as a team, a loving team,” he said. Even when great museum directors come and call them — and they did; his work is in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum, the Hammer Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago. He says he relies above all on his wisdom and discretion.

“Donna and I are in quarantine at our house in Brooklyn. Everyone in my community remains in a shelter, although there has been a pinch of people who seemed unresponsive to the severity of the pandemic and the associated risks. Initially, during the nascent stages of the epidemic, as the world underwent its profound shift from what was impeccably tenuous to what is monumental and historically shattering, I was held back in my tracks for about four weeks. I couldn’t do art. I just kept reading and watching everything about the coronavirus, the pandemic, and the immense heartache and pain that enveloped the world. After a while, I became more and more integrated into my studio practice. It seems that the magic of creation gave me an intermittent respite from “The Happening”. Somehow, I know that the surreal and profound impact the world is experiencing flows through my hands, into my work – not that I create works specifically about our present existence – but; conversely, the works certainly carry the weight and internalized acceptance of the current state of the world, as I pursue accepting it, letting go, dismantling concepts of control, and becoming as peacefully present as humanly possible. And yet I am constantly thoughtful – for compassion and empathy never slumber – as we hope and wait for better days, a sense of release and relief that seems a day late and an hour less after each day. that passes and every critical hour. —April 24, 2020

1587740898904-Korakrit_95310015

Korakrit Arunanondchai (center, in white tank top) rehearses alongside dancers and collaborators, including musician Aaron David Ross (far left, in glasses) and cinematographer Alex Gvojic (center, in red pants) – for her very first piece of performance art, which debuted at Performa 19.

Korakrit Arunanondchai
Last November, 33-year-old Thai artist Korakrit Arunanondchai launched her very first performance art piece, Together, at Harlem Parish, as part of Performa 19. The performance brought together over a dozen people, and, rightly so, he wanted to be shot with his collaborators. Collaboration is an integral part of Arunanondchai’s work; He was joined for the shoot by personalities from the Corakrite orbit, including musician Aaron David Ross, cinematographer Alex Gvojic – with whom he collaborated at the Venice Biennale – and a rotating cast of choreographers and dancers. . The large group of people, all from different fields, illustrate the moving lifestyle that the artist favors. Although he now lives and works in New York City, he often returns to Thailand, where he also owns a studio, and where he often finds rich cultural subjects to explore in his work. For most of the past decade he has built his own ever-expanding universe, illustrated through his video, multimedia and now performance work, which has been on display at MoMA PS1 and the Venice Biennale 2019. While filming , Arunanondchai said: “It will be a historic photo.”

“I am in my studio in Bangkok, Thailand. [I’m keeping in touch with my community] mostly on video and phone calls, and in person, I have my twin and my parents. I was working on a few projects before that, but now the condition of the world that will be the context for these projects has changed, so it’s pretty hard to keep going. Guess the process hasn’t changed, but maybe the terms have changed. “- April 26, 2020

1587740968980-subsribe1

[ad_2]

]]>
https://jeanspezial.com/how-many-people-does-it-take-for-art-to-work/feed/ 0
Exhibition of works of art by sovereign students | https://jeanspezial.com/exhibition-of-works-of-art-by-sovereign-students/ https://jeanspezial.com/exhibition-of-works-of-art-by-sovereign-students/#respond Sat, 16 Nov 2019 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/exhibition-of-works-of-art-by-sovereign-students/ [ad_1] Emma Callin and Sandy Koh at the Sovereign Student Art exhibition Print and digital download photos available Voting for one of the island’s biggest student art prizes will end next week. The Sovereign Student Art Prize 2019 is currently presenting the finalists for the prestigious art competition at the Youth Arts Center on Kensington […]]]>


[ad_1]

Voting for one of the island’s biggest student art prizes will end next week.

The Sovereign Student Art Prize 2019 is currently presenting the finalists for the prestigious art competition at the Youth Arts Center on Kensington Road and asking people to join us and help choose the winner from the popular vote of the public.

The annual competition, organized by the international financial group Sovereign, invites each school and high school to submit the work of their best students for prizes, and this year 12 very different works of art are on display.

There are two grand prizes on offer, the winner of the best play, decided by a jury, and the winner of the audience’s favorite play both receiving prizes of £ 1,000, with a further prize of £ 1,500 being awarded to schools of the two winners.

The finalists receive a prize of £ 500, of which £ 750 goes to school.

The jury is made up of some of the biggest names in the Manx art scene, including Anna Clucas, Jeremy Paul, Eve Adams and Maureen Kennaugh.

Organizer Sandy Koh, of the Sovereign Group, said they had placed the exhibit at the Youth Arts Center because they wanted to help raise the profile of the Youth Arts Isle of Man charity.

“They do an amazing job, and their main goal is to support the YAC with their work, their clubs and their societies, such as Art Tank, the Soundcheck music project and their various drama groups, some of which can be as cheap as £ 2 to participate, ”said Sandy.

The exhibition runs until Monday, November 18, and votes can be cast by then, either in person or through the Sovereign Art Prize’s Facebook page or the Art Foundation‘s website.

“This year we have a wide range of work, including a cutting edge political piece, a beautiful landscape and lots of portraits,” Sandy said.

“This is the first time that we also submit architectural works and also for the first time this year we have a 3D sculpture.

“The sculpture must be seen in real life, as it is difficult to get the same appreciation by looking at a photo online. “

The winners will be announced at a special event on Monday, December 9.

More information is available on the sovereignartfoundation.com website

by Mike Wade

mike.wade@iomtoday.co.im

twitter: @iomnewspapers

add a comment

[ad_2]

]]>
https://jeanspezial.com/exhibition-of-works-of-art-by-sovereign-students/feed/ 0
Illinois Art Station Teen Collective Presents Living Through Them Art Exhibit July 25-27 – News https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-teen-collective-presents-living-through-them-art-exhibit-july-25-27-news/ Wed, 17 Jul 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-teen-collective-presents-living-through-them-art-exhibit-july-25-27-news/ [ad_1] A student works on the upcoming art exhibit for Illinois Art Station’s Teen Collective. Illinois Art Station’s first Teen Collective, whose motto is “Groups of teens who make art to make a difference”, will host an opening reception for its exhibition Live through Them from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on July 25, in […]]]>


[ad_1]

A student works on the upcoming art exhibit for Illinois Art Station’s Teen Collective.

Illinois Art Station’s first Teen Collective, whose motto is “Groups of teens who make art to make a difference”, will host an opening reception for its exhibition Live through Them from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on July 25, in the Transpace Galleries located in Room 115 of the Center for Visual Arts (CVA) on the Illinois State University campus. This event is free and open to the public.

Teens from Bloomington High School and Bloomington Junior High collaborated to create three intersectional projects within this group show. There are trigger warnings for suicide, hate crime, and mental health.

Finding teenagers who enjoy creating art and who are passionate about social justice issues is one of the Teen Collective’s main initiatives. “I think a lot of young artists have tons of ideas in their heads and some of the more complex ideas are still conceptual,” said Luke Lowers, Teen Collective mentor and curator of the exhibition. “We were able to let them put all their ideas on the table and give them the means to make them come true. “

“Social justice is a big problem everywhere, including in our city,” said Gemi Palma, artist for the Teen Collective. “A lot of people can relate to one or more of these groups, so the show represents a path that we have taken as teenagers and also a path that others may have taken.”

Exhibition collaborations:
Equals
“Acceptance could have prevented that. “
Artists: Alonnah Wallace, Lydia Fisher
Karla Bailey-Smith of Artistic Answers: Murals Supervisor

Mirrored emotions
“One piece, two emotions.
Artists: Gemi Palma, Asa Lotz,
Janella Punzalan: artistic assistant

June 19
“Malcom on the outside, Martin on the inside-“
Artists: Jaylyn Haynes, Kaylin Richards

The Center for Visual Arts building is located at 468 W. Beaufort St., Normal, Illinois. Visitor parking is available in the University Street parking garage next to the CVA for $ 1 per hour and will be free after 5:30 p.m.

Teen Collective was launched by Illinois Art Station in 2019 and is “For Teens By Teens”. It all started with a collaboration with a local art educator, Monica Estabrook, of Bloomington High School (BHS), where the teens of the Teen Collective were recruited. “Monica was kind enough to not only let us use her classroom after school, but also give us some insight into how to help these teens,” Lowers said. “Overall, these kids are rock stars! We spent a lot of time in Monica’s class talking about issues that interest them, other artists and what they’ve done and ways they can create art that serves their community.

The mission of the Illinois Art Station (IAS) is to provide all children, youth, and their families with transformative learning through hands-on experiences in the visual arts. The IAS is also engaged in our role of supporting the academic mission of Illinois State University by providing opportunities for students and faculty to pursue learning, scholarship and civic engagement through the visual arts. Visit www.IllinoisArtStation.org or call (309) 438-4444 for more information.

[ad_2]

]]>