Art station – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:18:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jeanspezial.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Art station – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ 32 32 Florida Culture Available at Hong Kong Willie Art Station https://jeanspezial.com/florida-culture-available-at-hong-kong-willie-art-station/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:18:18 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/florida-culture-available-at-hong-kong-willie-art-station/ Kim and Joe Brown operate what they call an “art station” that offers paints, honey, and verse. The spire of lobster pot buoys rising high enough to be seen by drivers passing the Fletcher Avenue exit off Interstate 75 marks the location of a business that owners Kim and Joe Brown call a “fishing station.” […]]]>
Kim and Joe Brown operate what they call an “art station” that offers paints, honey, and verse.

The spire of lobster pot buoys rising high enough to be seen by drivers passing the Fletcher Avenue exit off Interstate 75 marks the location of a business that owners Kim and Joe Brown call a “fishing station.” art “.

The small wood-framed building adorned with buoys, fishing nets and assorted items that was once a popular bait shop catering to the needs of local anglers is indeed a Florida art gallery, which also serves a sweet taste.

The art is the work of the Hong Kong Willie Preservation Art Group (HKWPAG) and exemplifies the “Florida reuse” genre. In the case of HKWPAG’s production, that means painting nature-themed images on reclaimed wood that’s been salvaged from old structures in the Florida Keys that have disappeared as a result of stormy weather or stormy weather. a property redevelopment. Joe said the paintings he and Kim produced reflected the history of art in the Keys.

“They didn’t have a lot of art supplies and couldn’t just phone and order a canvas, but there were lots of wooden boards around, so they learned how to dry them and use them.” Joe added that the value of preservation art can be difficult for some people to appreciate. “Our support has come from a very small world of understanding people,” he said.

But recycling wood into art resonates deeply with Joe, a Florida native who as a child made money selling usable “found assets” he discovered in the trash cans of a landfill that operated on a property owned by his family.

If a space needs a three-dimensional touch of Florida decor, large branches of natural driftwood, like the treasure that washed ashore after Hurricane Irma hit the Keys, are sometimes available.

For those who love honey, the Browns also sell Tampa Gold, their unfiltered brand that they harvest from hives on remote wilderness properties.

As for the worms, they are still sold locally, but now they are for their casts, for the gardens which are in demand, although if a fishing enthusiast wants a few wigglers, Joe says he is happy to help.

Hong Kong’s Willie Art Station is rated “Worth Seeing” by travel website roadsideamerica.com, and you can find it near exit 266 of I-75 at 12212 Morris Bridge Rd. in Tampa. You can also visit HongKongWillie’s Facebook page or, as Joe suggests, “Google Hong Kong Willie”.

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Illinois Art Station gears up for summer – with a new local chef at the helm https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-gears-up-for-summer-with-a-new-local-chef-at-the-helm/ Fri, 13 May 2022 11:59:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-gears-up-for-summer-with-a-new-local-chef-at-the-helm/ Youth art camps are already filling up at the Illinois Art Station. As the center turns the corner on a full year since moving into their new home on Vernon Avenue, new leadership from a familiar face in the Twin City arts scene is bringing the nonprofit back to its roots. communities and relaunches the […]]]>

Youth art camps are already filling up at the Illinois Art Station. As the center turns the corner on a full year since moving into their new home on Vernon Avenue, new leadership from a familiar face in the Twin City arts scene is bringing the nonprofit back to its roots. communities and relaunches the mural project for the first time since 2019.

Beginning June 28, the Youth Mural Project brings together local youth, police and community leaders for two weeks of artistic creation, culminating in a public unveiling on July 9 and a performance in front of the new mural.

Previous youth mural projects have resulted in murals on Constitution Trail near Washington Street and at the intersection of West Market Street and Morris Avenue in Bloomington. The project’s multiple organizational partners include Artolution, BCAI Cultural Arts & Humanities, District 87, Western Avenue Community Center, the City of Bloomington, and the Bloomington Police Department.

Hannah Johnson is the new executive director of the Illinois Art Station.

“We’re really looking to highlight how anyone in our local community and beyond is creating safe spaces,” said IAS Executive Director Hannah Johnson, who spoke to WGLT on her second day on the job. .

“What does it mean to be safe, to feel safe, to make others feel safe? With our young artists and with our artist officers, we can build relationships,” Johnson said. “We can create something really beautiful and impactful that will continue to inspire dialogue.

Johnson succeeds Laura Jaster — who held the post for less than two years — as head of the fledgling nonprofit initially associated with Illinois State University. Johnson, a Bloomington native, previously worked as an education program coordinator at the McLean County Museum of History.

Johnson sees the move from history to visual art as a natural extension of her upbringing. As the child of two theater artists immersed in the Bloomington-Normal art scene, the arts are part of Johnson’s DNA. She said visiting friends as a child helped her realize that not everyone’s walls were covered in locally made art.

“You kind of start to realize that our situation might be unique,” ​​she said.

Johnson attended schools in District 87, graduated from Bloomington High School, and has two history degrees: one from Illinois Wesleyan and one from Illinois State. Prior to working at the McLean County Museum of History, she completed internships at the David Davis Mansion and the Dr. Jo Ann Rayfield Archives.

“What’s so great about the McLean County Museum of History is that it’s all local,” Johnson said. “You build community, you build identity as you move. That’s what really captured my interest (at Illinois Art Station) and built on my previous experience.

While executive leadership is a new challenge for Johnson, she said the many hats she wore at the museum fully prepared her for the IAS. Johnson joins program coordinator Joey Hatch, the only other full-time staff member.

“At any time, I can get pulled into a program, and all of a sudden I’m doing art with kids,” Johnson said. “And then the next minute I might meet with a donor or submit a grant. That was really the relationship I had with working at the history museum.

The timing of the Illinois Art Station’s expansion during the pandemic could be considered a plus. In a previous interview, Jaster told WGLT that they planned to grow slowly after moving into the new building in 2021, and so weren’t hampered by capacity limits or previous precedent during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Johnson agreed and also said “the numbers are there.” Its main goals are to continue to raise awareness about IAS and leverage its deep community ties.

“Illinois Art Station has always had local support. When it comes to people in the leadership role, though, I’m the first to be a Bloomingtonian,” Johnson said. “This is not a criticism of anyone who has come before. I think it’s a testament to the opportunity and excitement around this organization that people were literally willing to move in and uproot their lives to come and serve. … It took me over 30 years to put together this overview, so I really hope we can see what piece of the puzzle Illinois Art Station is with our other local arts partners.

A highlight of IAS’s colorful and airy new building along Constitution Trail is the gallery near the front doors, which features a rotating display of art installations by and for children. Johnson believes that legitimizing youth artistic production is an essential part of cultivating a healthy community. Also, working with children feels good.

“There’s always potential in any child,” Johnson said. “Even on the worst day — even that kid who’s the grumpy Gus in the room — you know you can turn things around.”

Spaces remain for Art in Plain Sight on June 6 in partnership with Miller Park Zoo and for smARTs Camp July 25-29 on Neurodiverse Artists for 11-14 year olds. The community unveiling and performance of the Youth Mural Project will take place on July 9th. More information at illinoisartstation.org.

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THE PINK UNICORN announced at ART Station in Stone Mountain, April 28 https://jeanspezial.com/the-pink-unicorn-announced-at-art-station-in-stone-mountain-april-28/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 00:34:35 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-pink-unicorn-announced-at-art-station-in-stone-mountain-april-28/ ART Station presents Out Front Theater Company’s production of this award-winning solo play. Kenna Redding plays Trisha, a Christian widow, who must choose between learning to provide for her child or maintaining the status quo in her conservative Texas town after her teenager comes out as “gender queer” and opens a chapter of the Gay […]]]>

ART Station presents Out Front Theater Company’s production of this award-winning solo play. Kenna Redding plays Trisha, a Christian widow, who must choose between learning to provide for her child or maintaining the status quo in her conservative Texas town after her teenager comes out as “gender queer” and opens a chapter of the Gay Straight Alliance at the local high school. With lively wit and humor, this rich and poetic story explores what it means to be a parent and advocate in these changing times.

Inspired by personal events experienced by playwright, Elise Forier Edie, the “powerful message of this brilliantly wise and inspiring work” (NY Theater Now) has touched audiences across the United States and Canada. After watching gay people being shunned and excluded from a local school and church, Edie explained that she started writing The Pink Unicorn “in an effort to deal with my anger and fear over these incidents.

What were these people so afraid of? Why would they twist logic and defy reason and even hurt their own children to prevent the harmless LGBTQ community from coming out and enjoying the rights of all other Americans? And what could I do about it? How could I change it? How could I make a difference?”

Masks are optional for fully vaccinated people and highly recommended for unvaccinated people. ART Station is closely monitoring the evolving situation and will continue to adjust policies in accordance with CDC guidelines and recommendations.

The Out Front Theater Company’s production of The Pink Unicorn, directed by Paul Conroy, will have performances Thursday, April 28, Friday, April 29, and Saturday, April 30 at 8:00 p.m., Saturday Matinee, May 1, at 3:00 p.m. All performances will be held at the ART Station Theater located at 5384 Manor Drive in Historic Stone Mountain Village 770-469-1105. artstation.org.

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The Art Station returns to Wisbech https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-station-returns-to-wisbech/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-station-returns-to-wisbech/ Wisbech-based artist Dan Donovan is set to bring his colorful and lively art station to Wisbech Market Place later this month. Dan and his team will invite people to come and enjoy expressing themselves through painting on March 26th. This dynamic and popular community arts event, which will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., […]]]>

Wisbech-based artist Dan Donovan is set to bring his colorful and lively art station to Wisbech Market Place later this month.

Dan and his team will invite people to come and enjoy expressing themselves through painting on March 26th.

This dynamic and popular community arts event, which will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., is open to Wisbech residents and visitors of all ages, it is free and all materials are provided.

Hilary Cox Condron and Dan Donovan pictured on a previous visit to Wisbech. (55322313)

Dan said: “This art station is a place to freely express yourself, have fun and explore color and freeform painting in a communal work of art. It’s open to everyone, of all ages and abilities. and I know from previous events that the people of Wisbech are a creative community.”

Dan and his team will be joined by community artist Hilary Cox Condron. They both share a passion for Wisbech and enjoy spending creative time in the city.

Painting will not be the only experience offered. There will be live folk music from the Shackleton Trio, balloon modellers and stilt walkers – all part of the celebration of art.

Some of the works previously created in Wisbech.  (55322322)
Some of the works previously created in Wisbech. (55322322)

Dan works with many different groups and organizations as an artist, graphic designer, filmmaker, photographer and musician. Her heart is in creativity and encourages the “artist” in everyone.

The Art Station is part of a series of Welcome Back events in the city that have been made possible with funding from the government and the European High Street Regional Development Fund.

The team including Hilary Cox Condron and Dan Donovan will be in Wisbech later this month.  (55322325)
The team including Hilary Cox Condron and Dan Donovan will be in Wisbech later this month. (55322325)
Some of the works previously created in Wisbech.  (55322319)
Some of the works previously created in Wisbech. (55322319)



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The Week on TV: Pam & Tommy; The Forbidden Art of Mary Beard; station eleven; Race and Medical Experiments: What’s the Truth? | Drama https://jeanspezial.com/the-week-on-tv-pam-the-forbidden-art-of-mary-beard-station-eleven-race-and-medical-experiments-whats-the-truth-drama/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-week-on-tv-pam-the-forbidden-art-of-mary-beard-station-eleven-race-and-medical-experiments-whats-the-truth-drama/ Pam &Tommy (Disney+)The Forbidden Art of Mary Beard (BBC Two) | iPlayerstation eleven (Starzplay)Racial and medical experiments: what is it? the truth? (Channel 4) | All 4 It’s weird to think of the Disney+ series Pam &Tommy like a period piece, but since it’s set in the 1990s, that’s what it is. Based on an […]]]>

Pam &Tommy (Disney+)
The Forbidden Art of Mary Beard (BBC Two) | iPlayer
station eleven (Starzplay)
Racial and medical experiments: what is it? the truth? (Channel 4) | All 4

It’s weird to think of the Disney+ series Pam &Tommy like a period piece, but since it’s set in the 1990s, that’s what it is. Based on an article by Amanda Chicago Lewis, it dramatizes the fallout from the sex tape stolen from Mötley Crüe’s Tommy Lee and Playboy model/Baywatch actor Pamela Anderson, and also serves as a time capsule of the dawn of Internet pornography and sexual mores of the time. Nowadays, would Anderson be ashamed on a world level? Mind you, just as she didn’t consent to the release of the tape (a hedonistic sex marathon supposedly grossing $77 million), she also didn’t give her blessing to this series, which is something to consider as you go. and as the eight episodes unfold. The tone borders on hyperreal — at one point, Lee’s penis speaks, pulling away like a CGI uncooked sausage — but the people are real.

Craig Gillespie (Me Tonya) directs the first three episodes and is also an executive producer. What saves Pam &Tommy to disappear beneath a seething sea of ​​retrospective-“ick” is a crisp script by Robert Siegel (The wrestler) – Lee shouting, “I’m going to be a dad. Express” – and performances of bravery. Lily James is transformed into Pam with hairpieces, fake teeth and prosthetics, including breasts so gargantuan that viewers may think less about sex and more about biting bra straps and backaches. At first, there are concerns that James will play Anderson as a human pout, a ’90s Marilyn Monroe who chews off a pinky finger in denim shorts, but as the nightmare develops, his vulnerability and anger also increase.

As Lee (tattooed, jockstrapped, strutting around his Malibu mansion waving a gun), Sebastian Stan (Captain America: The First Avenger) becomes a full comic LA rock star, but in all honesty, so do most LA rock stars. Seth Rogen (who helped develop the project) is indeed in the role of the horribly treated worker who steals the tape, but we see him far too much: his justifications, his regrets, his scam too, his interest in theology… that’s already enough! Indeed, after lively opening episodes, the series begins to struggle as it embarks on legal actions stemming from the gang’s leak. This show seems to want to be seen in the same light as Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1997 pornographic masterpiece boogie nights, but the pungent mix of sleaze and heart isn’t quite there. James is dynamite though: Anderson isn’t portrayed as a Barbie doll throwing a tantrum, but as a real, hurt woman.

For the shock of the illicit, the first of the two-part BBC Two documentary The Forbidden Art of Mary Beard delivered arty obscenities and cultural smut in spades: penises galore, atrocities of war, incest, bestiality. It wasn’t long before I was so exhausted and desensitized, a full fledged multi-species orgy could have broken out on the other end of the couch and I could have just sighed and thrown on some wet wipes.

Mary Beard and Daphne Todd, with Todd’s painting of her mother, in Mary Beard’s Forbidden Art. Photo: Lion Television/BBC

It was a gripping documentary in which the Cambridge University classics professor examined not only banned works, but also works of art that people choose to shy away from. Tracey Emin spoke candidly about her work, detailing her assaults, abortions and cancer: “If I go through hell, I paint hell. Turner Prize winner Martin Creed showed videos showing people vomiting first, then defecating on the floor (shocking – no one wiped). Daphne Todd won the BP Portrait Award in 2010 for her painting of her 100-year-old mother shortly after her death. Todd stopped painting it after three days, saying, “I didn’t want it to get to the point where there was a smell, I guess.” Even Beard pales at that one.

Mackenzie Davis as Kirsten on Station Eleven.
Mackenzie Davis as Kirsten in the “meaty and absorbing” Station Eleven. Photography: HBO Max

A 10-part Starzplay adaptation of Emily St John Mandel’s 2014 bestseller, station eleven, adapted by Patrick Somerville, arrives with an eerily familiar theme. A virus destroys the world’s population, and years later a troupe of comedians travel, foraging, surviving, performing the works of Shakespeare, keeping the spirit of creativity alive.

I wasn’t optimistic (looking for hippie troupes? I’ve had my time at Glastonbury), but a few episodes I find station eleven richly themed and intriguing. It’s about the wars outside and inner world (love and hope versus evil and threat). In the virus scenes, it’s inky in its darkness: the dead collapse on the workstations; a plane crashes in a long, slow moment; snow-covered cars are stuck in a motionless traffic jam.

Danielle Deadwyler is haunting as the heartbroken, unmotivated author of a graphic novel called Station Eleven. Mackenzie Davis is raw and believable as Kirsten, who was a child actress who performed on stage in King Lear when the plague hit and the leader (Gael García Bernal) died. Kirsten becomes one of the Shakespearian performers, but is she overzealous to protect the troupe at all costs?

On time, station eleven chokes on themes, time zones and characters, and liberties are taken with reality: in this post-civilization, everyone’s teeth are white and straight – obviously all dentists have survived. Yet, especially given our own recent history, this is meaty, absorbing fare, with a genuine sense of global and personal catastrophe.

Sometimes a documentary suddenly wakes you up and makes you see things differently. Seyi Rhodes’ hardworking documentary on Channel 4 Racial and medical experiments: what is it? the truth? does exactly that. An examination of heightened vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minorities, he took a forensic look at why some people of color harbor an ingrained distrust of science and medicine.

Seyi Rhodes in Tuskegee, Alabama, in Race and Medical Experiments: What's the Truth?
Seyi Rhodes in Tuskegee, Alabama, in Race and Medical Experiments: What’s the Truth? Photography: Uplands TV

Rhodes traveled to the United States to tell a dark story. In Tuskegee, Alabama, black people with syphilis were treated as experiments and allowed to die, even though a cure was available. Among other scandals, he also looked into the 20th century testing of mustard gas on hundreds of British and Indian soldiers. Rhodes, who is vaccinated himself, directed this shocking documentary with calm authority, explaining how people of color help each other overcome deep hesitation. It was a precious and sobering hour, illuminating a bright torch in a dark area.

What else am I watching

BBC Three Relaunch
The channel’s return to terrestrial television last week included RuPaul’s Drag Race UK Vs the world and repetitions of Flea bagoriginally aired on BBC Three, as did Sally Rooney normal people. An adaptation of Rooney’s first novel, Conversations With friends, is imminent.

Iwan Thomas on Celebrity Hunted 2021.
Iwan Thomas on Celebrity Hunted 2021. Photography: Chloe Knott

Hunted celebrity
(Channel 4)
A celebrity version of the show in which the contestants evade capture by “hunters”, but for how long? In the first game, former Olympic sprinter Iwan Thomas went home! (Last time Stanley Johnson appeared to be going on vacation.) All to benefit Stand Up to Cancer.

The tourist
(BBC One)
The series finale of the Australian outback-based thriller that turned out to have more plot than a placemat. Still, Jamie Dornan and Danielle Macdonald are good, the locations are beautiful, and at least it’s a bit different.

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Watch Now: Illinois Art Station to Expand Bloomington-Normal Programs for Spring | Arts and theater https://jeanspezial.com/watch-now-illinois-art-station-to-expand-bloomington-normal-programs-for-spring-arts-and-theater/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 00:30:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/watch-now-illinois-art-station-to-expand-bloomington-normal-programs-for-spring-arts-and-theater/ [ad_1] A nonprofit arts organization hopes to change lives through the arts. David proeber NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station is ready to welcome the children of Bloomington-Normal “home” where they can be messy and explore new means of expression through art. “I’m so excited to have people come and participate with us,” said Joey […]]]>


[ad_1]

A nonprofit arts organization hopes to change lives through the arts.



David proeber




NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station is ready to welcome the children of Bloomington-Normal “home” where they can be messy and explore new means of expression through art.

“I’m so excited to have people come and participate with us,” said Joey Hatch, education coordinator for the group. “Our goal is to do as much art with as many children as possible, so it’s very exciting to be able to have the opportunity to do that in our new building.”






The exterior of the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, in a wooded area near Constitution Trail is shown.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


The station, now in its first brick-and-mortar location at 101 E. Vernon Avenue in Normal, experienced a “slow opening” this fall, with some programs starting after the official opening in September. But this spring, educators are ready to go “deep” with expanded programs hosted at the new facility.

The non-profit organization, which has been providing artistic experiences for children and their families with mobile programs offered since 2018, had to embark on in-house programming in part because heavy summer rains pushed back the opening schedule. said Laura Jaster, executive director of the Illinois Art Station.






121521-blm-loc-1artstation

Laura Jaster, executive director of the Illinois Art Station, monitors the organization’s gallery at 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, Tuesday. Visit pantagraph.com to see a video with this story.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“We had a lot of ideas about what would happen, but the reality is always different and more interesting than your ideas,” she said. “It just gave us time to really get into space, inhabit it a bit before we went too far into anything.”

Now, the nonprofit is moving from having no facilities and just focusing on community outreach to bringing kids into studios and creative spaces.

Previously they were limited by what materials they could carry, but now “we’re able to make the mess and really get into the art and behind what kids want to do with their art,” Hatch said.






121521-blm-loc-3artstation

Supplies fill a studio at the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal. Four programs will be offered in the spring.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


Four core programs will be offered in spring 2022 in the form of three-week sessions depending on age groups.

“Itsy” is intended for children 3-5 years old as an early exploration. Their classes are held in the larger of IAS’s two studios, designed to allow children to mess around and even draw on tables, thanks to the surfaces of the whiteboard.

The “Art After 3 p.m.” classes are aimed at children ages 6 to 12, regarding exposure to new ideas, new artists, new materials and new techniques, Jaster said.

The college program, “smARTs Lab,” is at the intersection of different disciplines and this spring kids will focus on the arts and engineering.

High school students can participate in “Arts in Action” classes in which they address issues that concern them through art. Above the station stairs is an example of high school work: a globe created from plastic waste collected in a Bloomington park in partnership with the Ecology Action Center.






121521-blm-loc-4artstation

A unique hanging sculpture created by children from the Boys and Girls Club talks about the use of recycled plastics found in the environment. The sculpture hangs at the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“In all of our classes it’s really about them creating something that is close to their hearts and that is not like everything else,” Jaster said. “Usually, when they leave, nothing is alike. Even though they all use the same basic materials or the same basic inspiration, they all do something drastically different.

The art station is also expanding to include programming for homeschooled children in the Bloomington-Normal community, offering a six-week program focused on creative expression and skill development.

Every Saturday, drop-in hours are available from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., when kids can come and create without specific guidelines or limits – “to explore and play while creating,” Jaster said.






121521-blm-loc-5artstation

Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, is located in a wooded area next to Constitution Trail.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“At the end of the day, we want people to feel comfortable coming here, having fun and doing things, no matter where they’re from or where they’re from,” she said. declared. “Even if they’re not into art, I like to think they’ll find something really cool and enjoyable here. “

Because the IAS mission is to reach as many children as possible and involve them in creation, the station also offers scholarships for classes and programs, and Jaster said she would keep trying. meet children where they are through community partnerships.

Contact Kelsey Watznauer at (309) 820-3254. Follow her on Twitter: @kwatznauer.

[ad_2]

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Illinois Art Station to Expand Bloomington-Normal Programs for Spring https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-to-expand-bloomington-normal-programs-for-spring/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-to-expand-bloomington-normal-programs-for-spring/ A non-profit arts organization hopes to change lives through the arts. DAVID PROEBER NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station is ready to welcome the children of Bloomington-Normal “home” where they can be messy and explore new means of expression through art. “I’m so excited to have people come out and participate with […]]]>

A non-profit arts organization hopes to change lives through the arts.

DAVID PROEBER


NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station is ready to welcome the children of Bloomington-Normal “home” where they can be messy and explore new means of expression through art.

“I’m so excited to have people come out and participate with us,” said Joey Hatch, Education Coordinator for the group. “Our goal is to make as much art with as many kids as possible, so it’s very exciting to have the opportunity to do that in our new building.”






The exterior of Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, in a wooded area near Constitution Trail is shown.


DAVID PROEBER, THE TROUSER


The station, now in its first brick-and-mortar location at 101 E. Vernon Ave. at Normal, had a “slow opening” this fall, with some programs starting after the official inauguration in September. But this spring, educators are ready to go “all the way” with expanded programs housed in the new facility.

The nonprofit, which provides arts experiences for children and their families with mobile programs offered since 2018, had to embark on in-house programming in part because heavy summer rains pushed back the opening schedule. , said Laura Jaster, executive director of the Illinois Art Station.







121521-blm-loc-1artstation

Laura Jaster, executive director of the Illinois Art Station, looks at the organization’s gallery at 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, Tuesday. Visit pantagraph.com to see a video with this story.


DAVID PROEBER, THE TROUSER


“We had a lot of ideas of what would happen, but the reality is always different and more interesting than your ideas,” she said. “It just gave us time to really settle into the space, to inhabit it for a bit before we got too deep into anything.”

Now, the nonprofit is transitioning from having no facilities and focusing solely on community outreach to bringing kids into studios and creative spaces.

They used to be limited by the materials they could carry, but now “we’re able to get dirty and really get into the art and behind what the kids want to do with their art,” Hatch said.







121521-blm-loc-3artstation

Supplies fill a studio at the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal. Four programs will be offered in the spring.


DAVID PROEBER, THE TROUSER


Four basic programs will be offered in the spring of 2022 in the form of three-week sessions according to age groups.

“Itsy” is intended for children aged 3 to 5 as an early exploration. Their lessons take place in the larger of IAS’s two studios, designed to allow children to mess around and even draw on the tables, thanks to the whiteboard surfaces.

“Art After 3 pm” classes are for ages 6 to 12 and are about exposure to new ideas, new artists, new materials and new techniques, Jaster said.

The middle school program, smARTs Lab, is at the intersection of different disciplines and this spring the children will focus on arts and engineering.

Secondary students can participate in “Arts in Action” classes in which they address issues that matter to them through art. Suspended above the stairs of the station, an example of the work of the high school students: a globe created from plastic waste collected in a park in Bloomington in partnership with the Ecology Action Center.







121521-blm-loc-4artstation

A unique hanging sculpture created by children from the Boys and Girls Club speaks to the use of recycled plastics found in the environment. The sculpture hangs at the Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal.


DAVID PROEBER, THE TROUSER


“In all of our classes, it’s really about them creating something they care about that’s unlike anything else,” Jaster said. “Usually when they leave, nothing is the same. Even though they all use the same base materials or basic inspiration, they all do something drastically different.

The Art Station is also expanding to include programs for homeschooled children in the Bloomington-Normal community, offering a six-week program focused on creative expression and skill building.

Every Saturday, drop-in hours are available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., when kids can come and create without specific direction or boundaries — “to explore and play through making,” Jaster said.







121521-blm-loc-5artstation

The Illinois Art Station, 101 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, is located in a wooded area adjacent to Constitution Trail.


DAVID PROEBER, THE TROUSER


“At the end of the day, we want people to feel comfortable coming here and having fun and doing things, no matter where they’re from or what their background is,” she said. “Even if they’re not into art, I like to think they’ll find something really cool and enjoyable here.”

Because IAS’s mission is to reach as many children as possible and engage them in creation, the station also offers scholarships for classes and programs, and Jaster said they will continue to try to meet children where they are through community partnerships.

Contact Kelsey Watznauer at (309) 820-3254. Follow her on Twitter: @kwatznauer.

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Connection points by Fiona Grady at The Art Station https://jeanspezial.com/connection-points-by-fiona-grady-at-the-art-station/ https://jeanspezial.com/connection-points-by-fiona-grady-at-the-art-station/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/connection-points-by-fiona-grady-at-the-art-station/ [ad_1] A new art installation will bring stained-glass-like colors to an old telephone exchange. Artist Fiona Grady creates a large-scale art installation for the public at The Art Station in Saxmundham. “Connection Points” was inspired by the station house, a former telephone exchange building. It features brightly colored vinyl that transforms the windows of the […]]]>


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A new art installation will bring stained-glass-like colors to an old telephone exchange.

Artist Fiona Grady creates a large-scale art installation for the public at The Art Station in Saxmundham.

“Connection Points” was inspired by the station house, a former telephone exchange building.

It features brightly colored vinyl that transforms the windows of the building into a series of curved arches that resemble colored threads weaving through the panes as they intersect, overlap, and connect with the architecture of the building.

The vinyl acts like a stained glass window diffusing light and casting shadows throughout the building.


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The building will also provide colored light at night when the building is lit from the inside.

Clare Palmier, Director of The Art Station, said: “We are delighted that Fiona has developed with us this unique, exciting and accessible visual project.

“We have spent the past two years transforming the first floor of the old telephone exchange from a dismal, disused space into the thriving creative hub of The Art Station on Saxmundham High Street.

“Fiona’s vibrant art installation creates its own vibrancy and optimism within and for our community and celebrates cutting-edge contemporary art in everyday rural Suffolk.”


Fiona Grady installs the connection points
– Credit: Emily Richardson

Artist Ms. Grady said: “I am truly delighted to be working on this ambitious large-scale installation at The Art Station.

“It’s great to be able to see my work take up the entire length of this incredible building.

“This is one of the largest installations in which I have used a whole panorama of windows along the side of a large building.

“I did a smaller scale installation earlier in the year on the entrance windows and I enjoy establishing a working relationship with The Art Station and spending time in Saxmundham.

“I’ve worked mainly in cities like London, Brighton and Wakefield and other cities around the world, so it’s great to bring work to a rural Suffolk market town.

The installation will open on Saturday October 30 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. It will be open every Saturday until Saturday December 3.

It will then be available for outdoor viewing for the next six months until April of next year.

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ART station upgrades begin to increase safety and build shelters – City of Albuquerque https://jeanspezial.com/art-station-upgrades-begin-to-increase-safety-and-build-shelters-city-of-albuquerque/ https://jeanspezial.com/art-station-upgrades-begin-to-increase-safety-and-build-shelters-city-of-albuquerque/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/art-station-upgrades-begin-to-increase-safety-and-build-shelters-city-of-albuquerque/ [ad_1] October 13, 2021 The construction of the ART station located on Central Avenue and San Pedro Drive kicks off a series of upgrades to several of the city’s existing platforms. An awning, passenger information screens, seats and bins are being installed on the San Pedro wharf, matching the equipment at other stations. Work began […]]]>


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October 13, 2021

The construction of the ART station located on Central Avenue and San Pedro Drive kicks off a series of upgrades to several of the city’s existing platforms.

An awning, passenger information screens, seats and bins are being installed on the San Pedro wharf, matching the equipment at other stations. Work began on Monday October 11 and will continue until early December. The Ministry of Municipal Development is also installing HAWK signals so that pedestrians can safely access the platform.

On Thursday, October 14, work will begin at the East Downtown ART station to install an awning above the platform. Construction during the first week will consist of removing the electrical equipment in order to install the canopy. The station will be out of service during the works. Passengers are asked to board and exit at the nearby stop # 66.

Upgrades to the Downtown West ART Station will begin on Monday, October 25, and work on the Old Town ART Station will begin the first week of November. Stations will be out of service during this period. Passengers are asked to board and exit at nearby stops # 66.

Construction of all downtown platforms will take approximately two months from their original start date. Work on these platforms will include new wiring and lighting and the reinstallation of existing electronics.

All projects will require the blocking of ART tracks near the platforms in both directions. The bus drivers will temporarily leave the ART tracks to bypass the site.

ABQ RIDE is Albuquerque’s primary form of public transportation, averaging 120,000 passengers on its buses each day.

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Illinois Art Station to Celebrate Grand Opening at Normal | Arts and theater https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-to-celebrate-grand-opening-at-normal-arts-and-theater/ https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-to-celebrate-grand-opening-at-normal-arts-and-theater/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/illinois-art-station-to-celebrate-grand-opening-at-normal-arts-and-theater/ [ad_1] NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station will officially open next month with a free day of creative activities. The IAS, a non-profit organization that provides arts experiences for children and their families through local partnerships, recently moved into their new home at 101 E. Vernon Ave. unnatural. “We can’t wait to start offering some […]]]>


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NORMAL – The Illinois Art Station will officially open next month with a free day of creative activities.

The IAS, a non-profit organization that provides arts experiences for children and their families through local partnerships, recently moved into their new home at 101 E. Vernon Ave. unnatural.

“We can’t wait to start offering some of our signature courses, like Itsy, in our own space,” said Joey Hatch, Education Coordinator at IAS, in a press release. “In addition to the IAS favorites, we will also take full advantage of our new space by launching new programs and expanding artistic engagement opportunities to our gallery as well as to the outdoor space.”






Members of the BCAI (Breaking Chains & Advancing Augmentation) School of Arts in Bloomington dance as part of a Bloomington Youth Mural Project unveiling ceremony at the intersection of West Market Street and Morris Avenue in Bloomington in June 2019. The Mural was a project of the Illinois Art Station, which envisions a permanent residence on Vernon Avenue in Normal.


KEVIN BARLOW, PANTAGRAPH FILE PHOTO


Founded in 2018, the arts education programming organization has worked on several projects, including large-scale murals by local youth and professional teaching artists in Market Street and Morris Avenue and inside the Constitution Tunnel. Trail under Washington Street.

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In June 2020, the IAS purchased the property at 101 E. Vernon Ave. and 605 and 607 S. Linden St. as the site of its first permanent location. The location was originally part of the Custer Bros. Nursery, which operated from 1890 to 1950 before relocating.

A grand opening will take place at the new IAS from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on September 11. The free event will include artistic activities and music.

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Two occupied homes at 605 and 607 S. Linden St. were purchased to make way for part of the Illinois Art Station. The land will eventually become a rain garden to help storm water runoff.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


“Pop Into IAS will be a fun and creative way for members of our community to learn more about IAS and our new space,” said Laura Jester, Executive Director of IAS. “We really hope everyone comes to see us.”

Regular hours will begin September 17th. The station will be open for artistic creation opportunities on Fridays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.






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Wildflowers in bloom along Sugar Creek near 605 and 607 S. Linden St. illustrate the natural habitat that will be part of the Illinois Art Station facility.


DAVID PROEBER, THE PANTAGRAPH


The art station will be open on Thursday for classes only.

Entrance fees to the Creation Stations, Itsy Open, the Open Studio, and all access to art are available at illinoisartstation.org.

Sculptor Tom Kirk presents his massive water sculpture at the Hangar Art Co. in downtown Bloomington on Wednesday.



David proeber




Contact Sierra Henry at 309-820-3234. Follow her on Twitter: @pg_sierrahenry.

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