Art factory – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 14:21:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jeanspezial.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Art factory – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ 32 32 Where coffee and classes collide: Midlothian’s art factory creates a market for creativity, casual food and community https://jeanspezial.com/where-coffee-and-classes-collide-midlothians-art-factory-creates-a-market-for-creativity-casual-food-and-community/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 14:21:42 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/where-coffee-and-classes-collide-midlothians-art-factory-creates-a-market-for-creativity-casual-food-and-community/ Tal Thompson (top) opened the Art Factory & Party Place in 2012 after her online makeup and cosmetics business needed a brick-and-mortar space. In 2018, it expanded to 26,000 square feet, providing space for children’s parties, art classes, and various gatherings, with coffee and snacks included. ASH DANIEL Art Factory & Party Place / Art […]]]>

Tal Thompson (top) opened the Art Factory & Party Place in 2012 after her online makeup and cosmetics business needed a brick-and-mortar space. In 2018, it expanded to 26,000 square feet, providing space for children’s parties, art classes, and various gatherings, with coffee and snacks included. ASH DANIEL

Art Factory & Party Place / Art and Coffee didn’t open as a place to have a cup of coffee, but it eventually made sense to serve some, so Tal Thompson did.

By her own admission, a selfless student, the Israeli immigrant was expelled from a standard school – then thrived in a school where she could pursue an artistic education. After mandatory service in the IDF, Thompson landed a job with the US military at the USO in Haifa. There she fell in love with an American biomedical engineer and, after 18 months of long-distance dating, moved to Georgia, married him, earned a degree in design at the Art Institute of Atlanta, and had two children. Thompson has used her graphic design talent in corporate positions to freelance on catalogs for clients like Bloomingdale’s. To make money on the side, she imported temporary tattoos from Israel and sold body art supplies to friends and neighbors from her kitchen table.

When the economy crashed in 2008, work in graphic design dried up and the Thompson family moved to Richmond, where her husband Cliff had landed a job. She found work as a creative director for political strategists at a direct mail marketing company, but after three years she had had enough. By 2012, she was ready to market her own products and savvy enough to design a website to sell them.

“I started working full-time to grow this body art business… face paint and other makeup products used primarily by artists,” she says. Before long, the online operation was too big to run outside of their home. Thompson rented a small space at the Market Square mall. It was near their home in Brandermill and a foray into bricks and mortar sales.

Thompson was pleasantly surprised by the response. “What happens when you open a door to the community? The community is coming! And not only do they come, they tell you what to do…” The biggest request was for Thompson to entertain kids with face painting and art at parties. This is how the Art Factory was born. “A party space allows you to organize these events… I don’t need to run. They come to me. My stuff is here, right? Much easier.”

ASH DANIEL

ASH DANIEL

The community welcomed newcomers. Soon Thompson was also offering art classes and art workshops. In 2018, Tal decided to expand from 2,600 to 12,000 square feet, accommodating larger party rooms and studios, and a huge play area inside the lobby, where they would also sell coffee. . Thompson thought the cafe would be a good way to appeal to moms with preschoolers. The renovations took eight months. The Art Factory reopened in December 2019 – just before the global COVID-19 pandemic.

By the time Thompson was forced to close in the spring of 2020, online sales had also dried up. Who needed makeup and body paint when shows around the world were suspended? Thompson had paid for the store’s renovations out of pocket, so the operation was debt-free, but several dozen employees were on payroll and rent was still due.

She was fearless. “In times of crisis, there is also the birth of opportunity,” says Thompson. Using samples from a friend, Thompson turned his staff into a balloon delivery service, throwing birthday parties for housebound boys and girls. It has also reoriented its offer of body decorations. “Parents were always stuck at home with their kids, so we started putting together art kits. Our makeup store had all the brushes with our brand on them. ‘factory with all step-by-step instructions and supplies. [Paycheck Protection Program] the loans helped to cover the wage bill.

The Market Square shopping center business in Midlothian operates daily from 7am to 6pm, with later hours at weekends.  ASH DANIEL

The Market Square shopping center business in Midlothian operates daily from 7am to 6pm, with later hours at weekends. ASH DANIEL

In fact, opening the store was a bigger challenge. The art studios were not classified as an “essential” business by the government. Nor the play area Thompson had inside the entrance. But the restaurants were. Moving the play area into a separate room allowed it to move Art Factory & Party Place (now with Art and Coffee) into the foodservice category. “So our coffee is our COVID baby,” she explains. And it’s flourishing.

Thompson attacked the coffee business with the same vigor that she sells tattoos, makeup, art lessons and balloons. It has partnered with Guide coffee roasters for its supplies (and essential know-how), and other locals for bread and cake pops. “He started making money the first month,” she says. “We added a coast to this crazy operation in order to capture our own traffic. If we take 45 kids to camp, that’s 45 families going in and out. And there’s always a totally cool community that just comes in for a coffee and sits down with their laptops and works. There are also merchandise for sale at the counter, from jewelry to soap, and of course, art. The shop is open 7 days a week, Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and weekends from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Thompson credits her success to keeping a close eye on her customers. “My dad owned a shoe store, so I grew up learning how to sell as a kid. But what I learned here in the States was more about the art of selling…from s “to sit down and observe our customers and see what they need and try to meet those needs. Everything we add has great intent. It either has to make sense as part of our process or have meaning because it serves the community.

Art Factory & Party Place / Art and Coffee is located at 4810 Market Square Lane. Phone: 804-716-5219. ¦

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Platforma art factory resumed work in Kyiv https://jeanspezial.com/platforma-art-factory-resumed-work-in-kyiv/ Wed, 18 May 2022 23:13:59 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/platforma-art-factory-resumed-work-in-kyiv/ Art Factory Platform as a kyiv creative cluster is working again. It is discussed on the cultural center’s Facebook page. “We are adapting to new conditions, continuing what we have started and planning for the future with ambition. Production, coworking, humanitarian headquarters, photography, it’s all there! Hundreds of square meters of warehouses, production facilities and […]]]>

Art Factory Platform as a kyiv creative cluster is working again.

It is discussed on the cultural center’s Facebook page.

“We are adapting to new conditions, continuing what we have started and planning for the future with ambition.

Production, coworking, humanitarian headquarters, photography, it’s all there! Hundreds of square meters of warehouses, production facilities and offices are ready to welcome the desired new residents “, & # 8211; The organizers also announced 2 new projects that will allow the Platform to help small businesses and the country’s economy.

Natasha Kumar

About the author of the article

Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter at the news desk since 2018. Prior to that, she wrote about early adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was a legal affairs correspondent for the Metro bureau. Prior to joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as an editor at the Village Voice and as a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch contact me via my natasha@timeshub.in

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Dear readers, the online edition joins the Front Pickup initiative and starts raising funds for a car for Ukrainian defenders, which we plan to drive from abroad. The Mitsubishi l200 SUV is already awaiting redemption. We have a few days. Help our soldiers get the right car. Paypal stopruorg@gmail.com Ethereum: 0x8ecf8dB15ef228331b87620c25383707fC6f3f57

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The Lansdowne Hotel was saved thanks to the Oxford Art Factory team taking the reins https://jeanspezial.com/the-lansdowne-hotel-was-saved-thanks-to-the-oxford-art-factory-team-taking-the-reins/ Mon, 16 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-lansdowne-hotel-was-saved-thanks-to-the-oxford-art-factory-team-taking-the-reins/ The rich history of the Lansdowne Hotel is set for another chapter, with the Oxford Art Factory team announcing that they have agreed to take over the reins. The OAF team have revealed they have reached an agreement with the owners of the beloved venue, ending plans which would have seen the Chippendale spot closed. […]]]>

The rich history of the Lansdowne Hotel is set for another chapter, with the Oxford Art Factory team announcing that they have agreed to take over the reins. The OAF team have revealed they have reached an agreement with the owners of the beloved venue, ending plans which would have seen the Chippendale spot closed.

In February, longtime caretakers Mary’s announced they would be moving away from the beloved pub and music venue, after learning the owners were turning the upstairs live music space into a hostel . The announcement stated that live music would cease at the site in April; however, concerts continued through May, sparking speculation that the venue might be saved.

Oxford Art Factory CEO and founder Mark Gerber has now confirmed that the OAF team will step in to take over the venue. “Oxford Art Factory can confirm the rumours. We are pleased to announce that we have agreed with the owners to shelve any plans which may see the demise of this iconic venue in the Sydney and Australian music and arts scene. “, said the OAF team. in a report.

The Lansdowne has stood proudly on the corner of Broadway and City Road for decades, acting as a breeding ground for up-and-coming local bands from the 80s and 90s through to today. After its closure in 2015, it was revitalized two years later by Jake Smyth and Kenny Graham of Mary’s.

Gerber and co also revealed that renovations to the site have begun, with plans to give the pub a full makeover with upgraded amenities, bathrooms and audiovisual systems, as well as new food and drink offerings .

“Music and art can never die. They make us stronger and allow us to live longer!” Gerber said. “Sydney doesn’t need to lose music venues anymore; it’s suffered enough. Lockdown laws and COVID-19 have severely affected a once thriving and vibrant nightlife, and I wasn’t going to let another one down. concert hall. the roadside – not under my supervision!”

To celebrate the good news, The Lansdowne will host a free Rejuve (nation) party on Saturday, June 25. The concert will last 12 hours from 5 p.m. to 5 a.m. and will feature a range of local favorite bands and DJs. You can expect more details to be announced soon.

The Lansdowne Hotel is located at 2–6 City Road, Chippendale.

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London Grammar plays an intimate gig at the Oxford Art Factory in Sydney next month https://jeanspezial.com/london-grammar-plays-an-intimate-gig-at-the-oxford-art-factory-in-sydney-next-month/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/london-grammar-plays-an-intimate-gig-at-the-oxford-art-factory-in-sydney-next-month/ British indie-pop trio London Grammar will perform a very good intimate concert at Sydney’s Oxford Art Factory as part of a new festival, Back the Night, due to take place next month. The event, which is presented by American Express, will take place on Sunday, May 29 at six venues across the city, starting at […]]]>

British indie-pop trio London Grammar will perform a very good intimate concert at Sydney’s Oxford Art Factory as part of a new festival, Back the Night, due to take place next month.

The event, which is presented by American Express, will take place on Sunday, May 29 at six venues across the city, starting at 2 p.m. and ending with the London Grammar performance at 7:30 p.m. It will also feature an assortment of local talent, with sets like Alex Lahey, Bakers Eddy, Odette, Boy & Bear, Maple Glider, Imbi and more. See the full range below.

Tickets will go on sale next Monday, May 2 at 9 a.m., with a pre-sale for Amex Card members tomorrow at 9 a.m. One ticket gives you access to all venues and shows, and proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Australian music association Support Act.

London Grammar will tour Australia and New Zealand next month behind their latest album, last year’s California soil, marking the band’s first down tour since 2017. The shows were originally scheduled to take place in February, but were postponed due to “ongoing difficulties with the pandemic”.

Kicking off on Saturday May 21 at the Belvoir Amphitheater in Perth, the tour will then continue to arenas in Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane before concluding in early June at Spark Arena in Auckland. Find dates and ticket details here.

Back the Night 2022 programming

Alex Lahey
Eddy Bakers
Sandridge Beak
boy and bear
Brendan Maclean
Cape Carter
Didirri
IMBI
Jesse Kent
London Grammar
Mady-Jane
maple glider
Odette
South Summit
Stevie John
Taka Perry
The Delta Riggs

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Art Factory’s SWEENEY TODD is well sung but rough around the edges https://jeanspezial.com/art-factorys-sweeney-todd-is-well-sung-but-rough-around-the-edges/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 13:30:08 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/art-factorys-sweeney-todd-is-well-sung-but-rough-around-the-edges/ Nostalgia is a powerful thing, because this reviewer’s experience of Art Factory’s production of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street clearly shows. For many years, Sweeney Todd was my favorite musical of all time, and although my preferences have changed somewhat over the years, Stephen Sondheim and Hugo Wheeler’s Gothic Revenge Tragedy still […]]]>

Nostalgia is a powerful thing, because this reviewer’s experience of Art Factory’s production of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street clearly shows. For many years, Sweeney Todd was my favorite musical of all time, and although my preferences have changed somewhat over the years, Stephen Sondheim and Hugo Wheeler’s Gothic Revenge Tragedy still holds a very special place in my heart. That sentimental value has proven to be a boon for Art Factory’s intimate output, which hits satisfying marks amid some notable stumbles. Although I am delighted to hear the songs I have loved since I was 16, I dare say that a lesser Sweeney Todd the fanatic may have enjoyed this production a little less.


This production, directed by the executive director of Art Factory Luke Hamilton, is competent. Sometimes it’s even quite loud – there are certainly highlights in his performances (the vocal quality is superb for the most part) and the intimacy of the space lends itself well to the kind of menacing atmosphere the show aims for. to mention. . However, there are small bumps and stumbles throughout this production that accumulate to drown out the potential impact.

Aesthetically, this production fits more into the Gothic interpretation of John Doyle‘s 2005 Broadway revival, in which the stage was designed to look like a mental hospital. For this iteration, the production designer Colton Berry (who also plays Anthony) painted the entire scene white except for a bloodstain on the back wall. Perhaps the point was to evoke a padded cell in a modern Bedlam, although I imagined one of the plastic-laden killing rooms of Dexter. I’m not outraged that the design doesn’t reflect the original’s devotion to Victorian-era industrialism; it has long been a staple of the contemporary Sweeney Todd productions to prioritize atmosphere over realism in the show’s design choices, and this production does that quite well.

Performance also hit most of the time, especially in the vocal department. Jared Alan Barnes is satisfying in the lead role, but only really soars in his portrayal of “Epiphany,” in which he finally begins to touch the searing rage that drives Sweeney’s actions. His voice has all the breadth and weight expected of a murderous barber, even if he sometimes loses confidence in his bass (I barely heard him during the “Johanna” quartet). I must point out, however, that whether intentionally or not, he makes such an impression of Len Cariou (the original Broadway Sweeney) that I wondered if I had unknowingly witnessed some kind of lip-sync performance of the original Broadway cast recording.

BWW Review: Art Factory's SWEENEY TODD Is Sung Well But Rough Around The Edges
Jared Alan Barnes
Photo Credit: Art Factory Staff

Barnes boasts a phenomenal scene partner in heather room, whose performance as Mrs. Lovett is arguably the best thing about this production. Unwavering by the litany of legendary actresses who have played Nellie Lovett, Hall takes command of the character and owns every beat of her performance. She leans more into the comedic elements of the character, but is careful that her brash exterior doesn’t overshadow Ms. Lovett’s more sinister interior. In several places, you can see the gears spinning behind its clownish facade, hinting at its darker machinations without giving too much away. Everything is finely calibrated and woven together to produce the show’s most fully realized performance. If I have one complaint about his performance, it’s that we sometimes lose some of his dialogue because of his overdone cockney accent.

Colton Berry and Ivanna Martinez do a great job filling the roles of young lovers Anthony and Johanna, though Berry seems to have to work a little harder to hit the character’s required high marks. He handles the challenge valiantly, but it’s safe to say he may not be used to Anthony’s soaring tenor (his assured, chesty growl on “The Ballad of Sweeney Todd,” on the other hand, made me shivers).

As despicable Judge Turpin, Sebastian Pinzon brings the sleazy but lacks some of the character’s menace. His threats to Anthony and his inadequacy with Johanna never seem to carry much gravity or weight. He sings well though, and there were audible gasps from the audience as he pulled his pants down during his performance of “Johanna.”

As the beleaguered Toby, David Martinez does a good job grounding his character’s innocence and love for Mrs. Lovett in his desperate desire to be valued, and he gets his fair share of pathos from it. As Toby’s former master, Adolpho Pirelli, Matthew Steven Lawrence plays with joy and aplomb, delivering breathtaking high notes.

When it comes to beggar woman and Beadle Bamford, Nicole Ercan sounds great but is far too hesitant with the character’s lewd propositions, which end up feeling awkward. Luke Hamiltonwho plays the Beadle, has fun with the twirling half of the mustache of the play’s villainous duo, but his voice is a little labored on “Ladies and Their Sensitivities.”

The set is also quite good, especially during the opening number and its covers. When the whole band sings the terrifying Sweeney Todd, they produce enough gravity to make you listen. Since the show book ends with a cover of “The Ballad of Sweeney Todd,” it at least allows the production to come in and out with a bang.

BWW Review: Art Factory's SWEENEY TODD Is Sung Well But Rough Around The Edges
heather room
Photo Credit: Art Factory Staff

A problem I have with the opening, however, is a problem I have with several other issues in the series: the directing is a bit lackluster. Characters will either freeze in place when they begin to sing, or they will move in unmotivated and clearly designed ways to produce variety. There are some engaging choices, like having Barnes break through imaginary space barriers and jump off the platform during “Epiphany.” However, a few songs stall because there isn’t enough for the actors to do.

Part of the problem is that the scene is framed by two large platforms, one representing Sweeney’s barbershop and the other representing Johanna’s bedroom in Judge Turpin’s house. This leaves only those two spaces and the small floor as potential play spaces, which means the actors are limited in how they can move around. After Sweeney commits his first kill, three members of the ensemble come out to perform another cover of the opening, and we have to wait for them to get on the platform, get into position and start circling him. . It doesn’t produce the effect I think is desired due to the limited amount of space on the rig, and having to wait for them to set up slows the pace of a rather crucial story pace considerably .

In fact, many of the problems in this production stem from the limitations of space. For example, Sweeney Todd is a show that requires virtually full orchestral accompaniment, which Art Factory’s relatively small performance space does not allow. Instead, the music is completely pre-recorded. Now, I don’t consider myself a snob when it comes to canned music; it’s often a necessary evil of smaller-scale productions like this, and it’s not impossible to pull off. However, the music for this show requires significant balance, as the speakers often blare so loudly that they drown out the actors on stage, who are already using microphones. Additionally, without a conductor to follow the cast, several musical cues were missed, forcing the performers to try to catch up (this was especially noticeable in “A Little Priest”, “Kiss Me” and “Pirelli’s Miracle Elixir”). While those moments didn’t take much away from the show, they made me nervous that the actors couldn’t keep up when the music started to get…let’s say Sondheim-esque.

A baffling choice was also made to pump fog through the theater for most of the show, which makes for a very atmospheric opening, but produces diminishing returns as the play progresses (meaning that i had had enough a third of the way through act one). In addition, the machine is very loud and the sound of its hissing behind the scenes is both very audible and very distracting.

Like I said, I love it Sweeney Todd, so I forgave some of those flaws, although there were times when the technical issues were enough to get me out. At the end of the evening, I came away satisfied, although some of that satisfaction was more due to my love for the piece than the quality of the production. Still, it’s a fun night at the theater and there are enough positives that less fanatical audiences can find something to enjoy. Provided some of the technical issues can be ironed out, it could very well become more of the gory thrill ride the show is designed to be; especially if the part of the crowd that cheered at the judge’s inevitable demise is any indication.


Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street runs from April 22 through May 8 at Art Factory. Tickets start at $25 and can be purchased at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sweeney-todd-tickets-161352604985 or by contacting the box office at (832) 210-5200.

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Pyrography, paintings, jewelry presented at The Hub Art Factory https://jeanspezial.com/pyrography-paintings-jewelry-presented-at-the-hub-art-factory/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/pyrography-paintings-jewelry-presented-at-the-hub-art-factory/ CANTON – Heidi Fawver was engulfed in art on the second floor of The Hub Art Factory. A funky space helmet, a dynamic portrait of David Bowie, an oversized image of Martin Luther King Jr., mannequins, swirls of ceiling artwork and more were visible from all directions. Dressed in a thrift-store patterned green cardigan, Fawver […]]]>

CANTON – Heidi Fawver was engulfed in art on the second floor of The Hub Art Factory.

A funky space helmet, a dynamic portrait of David Bowie, an oversized image of Martin Luther King Jr., mannequins, swirls of ceiling artwork and more were visible from all directions.

Dressed in a thrift-store patterned green cardigan, Fawver was in her element, seated about 20 feet from her corner of a studio and above the gallery space where she will be exhibiting artwork during the his inaugural solo exhibition, “Seeking Inner Wisdom,” from 5 to 10 p.m. Fridays at The Hub, 336 Sixth St. NW.

Canton light festival to dazzle:“What you will see here, you can only see here.”

“I feel more inspired…here than anywhere else as an artist,” she said. “Downtown in general is full of very creative people.”

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A new gallery is added to the Dubuque art scene https://jeanspezial.com/a-new-gallery-is-added-to-the-dubuque-art-scene/ Wed, 23 Mar 2022 12:24:12 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/a-new-gallery-is-added-to-the-dubuque-art-scene/ if you are going to WHAT: The opening night of the Art Factory WHEN: 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, March 25 OR: 120 E. Ninth St. IN LINE: artfactorydbq.com Hieyler Talley is in love with color. Just look at his latest creations to realize that. Vibrant pinks collide with bursts of orange, forming a […]]]>
if you are going to

WHAT: The opening night of the Art Factory

WHEN: 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, March 25

OR: 120 E. Ninth St.

IN LINE: artfactorydbq.com

Hieyler Talley is in love with color.

Just look at his latest creations to realize that.

Vibrant pinks collide with bursts of orange, forming a perfect marriage between the hues. Next, a deep blue washes over a canvas, splashes of color emerging from the darkness.

“I love the color,” Talley said, bursting into enthusiastic laughter. “When I was working on my art thesis, my teachers said, ‘OK. How about we try black and white? I just don’t think I have it in me.

The eight large-scale paintings that are part of a three-year-in-progress collection adorn the interior of a new gallery space perched atop a building in the Millwork neighborhood of Dubuque.

The Art Factory, as Talley dubbed it, will open at 120 E. Ninth St. on Friday, March 25.

After falling in love with The Mandolin Inn on Loras Boulevard, Talley and her husband, Wendell, moved to Dubuque a year ago, turning the former bed-and-breakfast into a permanent home.

“We had never heard of this place called Dubuque,” Talley said with a laugh. “We have lived all over the United States but had never really visited this region. It is so beautiful.”

But amid COVID-19, she’s found it difficult to find outlets for her work to be shown in a new community.

“It can be difficult to break into a new art market as a new or emerging artist,” said Talley, who previously called California, Texas and Minneapolis, among other places, home. “I got to a point where I was tired of asking permission.”

So Talley decided to embark on a lifelong dream of opening his own gallery. The space she fell on features a unique curvature in the ceiling that crowns exposed brick walls, hardwood floors, and a wall of windows that allows natural light to flood in.

His vision of space content is somewhat new for the region. Alongside her art, she intends to showcase the work of just one additional artist each month, which she thinks the intimate space will lend itself well to.

“I could open it up and host a lot of artists,” Talley said. “But I wanted to create an accessible space – where I could not only see my work, but also the work of a local student or other local artist who might need that kind of opportunity to develop their CV and make known. .”

Talley said these opportunities proved essential to his career as an artist.

Tapping into a creative mind from elementary school, Talley said she dabbled in everything from jewelry making to her true love: printmaking.

“I always wanted to do something,” she said. “But my mother didn’t want me to major in art. She wanted me to do something that made money. So I studied psychology.

However, mastering the inner workings of the mind did not hold Talley’s interest. She eventually found her way back to art, pursuing an MFA in painting at the Savannah (Ga.) College of Art and Design.

“I was in my 40s,” she said. “It was time for me to pursue my passion.”

Painting professionally for 10 years, Talley said her work is drawn from a highly emotional experience that uses mixed media and aims to explore a place in abstraction for black artists.

“I don’t draw or plan anything in advance,” she said. “I just let it come as it comes.”

It’s an inspiring technique that Talley hopes to share with artists who are still on the verge of perfecting their craft.

Plans for the site include educational and outreach opportunities, with a variety of intimate workshops from April through August.

Talley’s husband called his wife’s efforts inspiring, adding that he hopes it’s something the community will support.

“Watching Hieyler over the past few years complete her master’s degree while schooling and raising three daughters has been an inspiration to our entire family,” he said. “Hieyler is happiest when she creates and shares her love of beauty and color. I know she intends to make The Art Factory a vibrant place in Dubuque, and she generally achieves what she sets out to accomplish. I hope the people of Dubuque will support her.

Talley said she hopes the new gallery will help promote the engagement of local patrons, perhaps introducing them to new works and new creators, opening the door to the future growth of the city’s art scene.

“When I lived in Minneapolis, there were thousands of artists,” she said. “Art was such a part of the culture of the city, and the city did an amazing job supporting it and integrating it into everyone’s lives. I still get to know local artists. But Dubuque definitely has the infrastructure in place and the potential to become an art destination. I just hope to be a pin on this map.

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Death By Denim will play Oxford Art Factory – City Hub Sydney https://jeanspezial.com/death-by-denim-will-play-oxford-art-factory-city-hub-sydney/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/death-by-denim-will-play-oxford-art-factory-city-hub-sydney/ ]]>


For the past two years, live music across the country has been siled into our own states. Now that the borders have reopened, groups can finally get back on the road and tour everywhere. When the Perth Band death by denim playing Oxford Art Factory, all of that will change.

For the past two years, the indie psych rock band have been locked behind the iron border of Western Australia. In a recent interview with city ​​hub Death By Denim frontman Nik Iliadis discussed the inspiration behind the band’s name, their musical influences, their new approach to music-making, and the excitement within the band for the upcoming tour on the East Coast.

HOW THE GROUP HAS ITS NAME

Given the band’s unique name, we had to ask Nik where this idea came from. In response, Nik explained that it was guitarist Palle Mazzulla’s fashion sense in college that led them to take the name Death By Denim.

“During our freshman year of college, Palle would wear triple denim or just too much denim for someone doing a law degree. A friend of his told him he was ‘killing the denim’ for them, so everything immediately Death By Denim sounded like a cool name for a band.

From then on, the bond between Nik and Palle formed and slowly began to solidify as they wrote music together. As Nik and Palle’s relationship began to cement, they quickly realized that they would need a few more musicians to complete the band and luckily they were able to add people quite organically.

“The band grew really organically,” Nik recalls. “Palle had a mate, George, who played bass and keyboards, so he came on board straight away. Then George had a friend, Hamish, who played drums. Honestly, it all fell into place. place in a few weeks.

INSPIRATIONS & MUSICAL INFLUENCES

While the band members naturally came together, blending their various musical influences was time consuming but also incredibly exciting.

According to Nik, “everyone had a lot of different ideas” when they got together. For example, “Palle was a big fan of 80s hair metal. I was more into Brit-rock or R&B. George liked a mix of everything. Then, Hamish is into more riff-rock like Royal Blood for example. Blending all of these influences and inspirations is what sets Death By Denim apart from all others in the Australian music landscape.

STORY BEHIND THE NEW ALBUM, LUNAR ARC

Death By Denim’s new record Lunar Bow is a fantastic showcase of this new sound. Not only is this record uniquely Death By Denim, but the sheer joy the band felt during the recording process also shines through in the music.

“When we walk into the studio there are all kinds of different sounds flying around,” Nik recalls when asked if it was exciting trying to distill all of their influences into their own sound. “It’s definitely exciting…especially now that George and Hamish have also started to make their mark, it’s been a good change for the music.”

With Lunar Bow the group also took on a new approach to recording which saw them spend more time ruminating over the music rather than immediately releasing songs in the wild. This change was both a conscious decision and a decision imposed by the current state of the world. A look back at the creative process of Lunar Bow Nik said: “Having the time to record and then sit down with songs and come back to re-record if needed was really nice to have…I think in the future we’ll be spending more as well. time in the studio instead of just creating songs in a short time.”

CREATING DURING THE PANDEMIC

In terms of creative inspiration for Lunar Bow the pandemic environment also throws curveballs at Death By Denim.

“It was harder to write this new record because we weren’t able to do much,” Nik explained. “We didn’t want to write about sitting at home in isolation. We wanted to find something cool to write, so once we were able to tour WA last year, we got our juices back.

EXCITEMENT FOR THE OXFORD ART FACTORY CONCERT

As they now prepare to get the creative juices flowing by heading to the East Coast for a series of live shows, Nik said they’re all “very excited.” In particular, Death By Denim are delighted to play at the Oxford Art Factory.

“Even though we went on tour almost exactly a year ago, I feel like it’s been so long. We haven’t been to places like Sydney and Melbourne for so long. Our last gig in Sydney was at Lansdowne, which Palle said was one of her favorite gigs.While we love Perth and WA, we can’t wait to get back on track and play with our East Coast fans.

For East Coast fans planning to attend a Death By Denim show, Nik said they can expect to see them “have a great time on stage and bring some energy” to the show. Oxford Art Factory.

“A lot of our songs are a little soft, so a lot of people who have never seen us before but listen to us on Spotify are surprised by our live show. As part of the live, we bring the songs to life with a lot of singing moments and stuff like that. It’s just an inclusive good time!”

April 1st. Oxford Art Factory, 38/46 Oxford St, Darlinghurst. $30.09+bf Tickets and information: www.oxfordartfactory.com

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Layla Bacayo of The Art Factory awarded by Community College Australia for her art and advocacy for people with disabilities | The Daily Advertiser https://jeanspezial.com/layla-bacayo-of-the-art-factory-awarded-by-community-college-australia-for-her-art-and-advocacy-for-people-with-disabilities-the-daily-advertiser/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/layla-bacayo-of-the-art-factory-awarded-by-community-college-australia-for-her-art-and-advocacy-for-people-with-disabilities-the-daily-advertiser/ news, local news, MULTIFACETED ARTIST Layla Bacayo has been recognized by Community Colleges Australia (CCA) for her advocacy in the arts sector for people with disabilities. Ms. Bacayo has been a student at The Art Factory at Riverina Community College since it opened in 2016 and has used her residency to showcase the skills and […]]]>

news, local news,

MULTIFACETED ARTIST Layla Bacayo has been recognized by Community Colleges Australia (CCA) for her advocacy in the arts sector for people with disabilities. Ms. Bacayo has been a student at The Art Factory at Riverina Community College since it opened in 2016 and has used her residency to showcase the skills and creativity of diverse people. Art Factory staff nominated Ms. Bacayo for the CCA’s prestigious “Student of the Year” for her “fierce” and continuous advocacy. IN OTHER NEWS: Competing against hundreds of individuals across NSW, she was shortlisted as one of eight finalists – a rare achievement for a student from an unaccredited class. Although she didn’t earn the highest honor, the ACC was so impressed with her resume that they gave her their first achievement award. “I feel fantastic, it feels good,” Ms. Bacayo said. “[People with a disability] need to have a voice and know if they want to speak up, they can speak up. In June last year, Ms Bacayo was invited to Canberra to speak about the importance of inclusivity with the arts sector at the National Conference of Museums and Galleries. She has also found her foot in the door at numerous local events, including her own exhibition at Wagga’s Curious Rabbit in collaboration with local artists Sarah McEwan and Veronica Watson. Art Factory manager Leanne Dyer said Layla never let her disability limit her in any way. and that it seizes all the opportunities offered to it. “She’ll always say ‘I can do it’ and ‘just because I have a disability doesn’t mean I can’t’,” Ms Dyer said. “Layla’s practice is very professional, and so she’s always moving forward, she’s always looking to the future, and I think that’s part of her excellence in the art.” The Art Factory offers Ms. Bacayo and neurodiverse people a space to practice art and use it as a tool to communicate their worldview.Artists sell their art through the factory website and take 50% of the profits – l The other half goes to the cost of art supplies. Our reporters work hard to bring local, up-to-date news to the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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Jatiwangi Art Factory’s ‘Lair’ brings collaborative music to Kingston https://jeanspezial.com/jatiwangi-art-factorys-lair-brings-collaborative-music-to-kingston/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 13:24:29 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/jatiwangi-art-factorys-lair-brings-collaborative-music-to-kingston/ Jatiwangi Art Factory (JaF)an arts collective from Jatisura, Indonesia brings their musical ensemble to Kingston for a micro-residency. Sebastian De Line, Agnes Etherington’s Associate Curator in Indigenous Art Care and Relations, was introduced to JaF during his residency in Indonesia. “I always thought it would be a great opportunity to eventually invite JaF to my […]]]>

Jatiwangi Art Factory (JaF)an arts collective from Jatisura, Indonesia brings their musical ensemble to Kingston for a micro-residency.

Sebastian De Line, Agnes Etherington’s Associate Curator in Indigenous Art Care and Relations, was introduced to JaF during his residency in Indonesia.

“I always thought it would be a great opportunity to eventually invite JaF to my house and have a kind of reciprocal exchange where they could come here, see our art scene and participate in different programming,” De said. Line in an interview with The newspaper.

The collective’s use of clay is influenced by the historic terracotta industry of the Jatiwangi district, highlighting the area’s reputation for making terracotta tiles.

“From sculptural practices to musical practices, and even to perfumes [and] architecture, everything is made of clay [Jatisura’s] land,” he said.

The collective includes approximately 50 multimedia artists, musicians, designers and curators. Their music ensemble, lairis composed of six musicians who use clay instruments.

In partnership with the Agnes, the Isabel Bader Center for the Performing Arts and the Toronto Art Biennale, lair will deliver a range of programs to the communities of Kingston and Toronto.

March 6 marks the first event of the residency, a jam session hosted in the Agnes Etherington home.

“It will be a great opportunity for everyone here to meet and share different stories and music, [as well as] how we relate to the earth and [artist’s] musical practices,” said De Line.

The jam session will be an informal meeting where participants can listen to musicians and talk with local artists and teachers from the DAN school.

“It’s about spending time together – it’s a part of artistic practice that I find [is] the glue that is not always recognised,” he said.

De Line finds inspiration in the way JaF works together as a collective unit, unlike traditional European art which focuses on individual artists.

“[It’s] that kind of collective mentality that is very grounded in the land and in your community,” he said. “[Collective collaboration is] Something [I’ve noticed becoming] more and more interest here at home, but they’ve been doing this for a very long time in Indonesia.

lair will also record new music at Isabel’s Jennifer Velva Bernstein performance venue, culminating in a public broadcast event March 8 at 7:30 p.m.

“It’s kind of like an incubation period where they can go wild with all the really amazing people working there,” De Line explained.

“[They can work with [the Isabel’s] world-class technicians, equipment and great facilities, and hang out with our music experts [while] record songs.

De Line can’t wait to see what JaF will produce during his micro-residency.

“As a curator, I strive to facilitate the conditions that make a space comfortable, [and] feel hot [and] welcoming,” he said. “[So, I] really sit back and let the artists do their thing, [since it’s] what they do best, and see what great things come out of it.

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