Art appreciation – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 18:31:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jeanspezial.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Art appreciation – Jeanspezial http://jeanspezial.com/ 32 32 Carlow Nationalist – Art Appreciation Day was a riot of joyful music and creativity https://jeanspezial.com/carlow-nationalist-art-appreciation-day-was-a-riot-of-joyful-music-and-creativity/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 11:33:24 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/carlow-nationalist-art-appreciation-day-was-a-riot-of-joyful-music-and-creativity/ Second class pupils from Scoil Mhuire Lourdes, Tullow pictured during the school’s Arts Appreciation Day Photos: michaelorourkephotography.ie Lennie and Lillie enjoying the day Bronagh and Lena By Suzanne Pender AN EXPLOSION of art in all its forms thrilled the students of Scoil Mhuire Lourdes, Tullow recently when they held their Arts Appreciation Day. Each year, […]]]>

Second class pupils from Scoil Mhuire Lourdes, Tullow pictured during the school’s Arts Appreciation Day Photos: michaelorourkephotography.ie

Lennie and Lillie enjoying the day

Bronagh and Lena

By Suzanne Pender

AN EXPLOSION of art in all its forms thrilled the students of Scoil Mhuire Lourdes, Tullow recently when they held their Arts Appreciation Day.

Each year, a group participated in this wonderful event, which invited students, parents, family and friends to join in the celebration of the arts, while sharing some of the creative elements the children worked on.

The theme for this year’s Arts Appreciation Day was “Countries Around the World”, which evoked children’s creativity and color.

Music Generation Carlow, which operates at the school, also took part in the day and held a number of workshops which showcased the hard work of the children over the weeks.

Primary school explored the animal kingdom through music and movement with ‘Sing-say-dance-play’, developing their musical and creative skills.

The junior babies had a farm animal workshop, where they explored the sounds and actions of farm animals, while for the older babies it was a mini beats workshop and of the story of the “very hungry caterpillar” using their instruments and their voices.

The first class held a “Turtle and the Hare” workshop exploring the musical elements of tempo, rhythm, and fast and slow movement.

Scoil Mhuire Lourdes second classes held an underwater workshop using creative dance, singing, soundscape and also held a workshop on Irish wildlife, traveling to fields, hills, streams and wild corners of the country to explore wild animals. from Ireland.

The third class held a workshop called “A Musical Exploration of Harmony”, which worked on the West Indian song chosen by the classes, exploring many musical ideas, including harmony.

The fourth class held a creative movement workshop. This one had a Japanese theme, which allowed students to experiment and create their own unique arrangement.

The fifth class of girls from Tullow held a ‘Perform and Share’ workshop, where they had the opportunity to share an example of a musical session. For their grand finale, they performed a piece in Swahili, demonstrating some of the skills they had mastered.

The sixth class held an African drumming workshop, exploring the sight, sound, feel and power of playing as a unified group during a drumming circle. The children then incorporated their percussion into the African piece they chose, WakaWaka.

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Mother’s Day event is an opportunity for crafts, baking and art appreciation https://jeanspezial.com/mothers-day-event-is-an-opportunity-for-crafts-baking-and-art-appreciation/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:53:28 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/mothers-day-event-is-an-opportunity-for-crafts-baking-and-art-appreciation/ Jim Stucko remembers going to bed at night and his dad walking into the kitchen. Elder Stucko was going to bake a few batches of his winning rye bread recipe so he could bake it and bring it to friends in the morning. Not only was Stucko, a former resident of Elba, a talented sculptor […]]]>

Jim Stucko remembers going to bed at night and his dad walking into the kitchen. Elder Stucko was going to bake a few batches of his winning rye bread recipe so he could bake it and bring it to friends in the morning.

Not only was Stucko, a former resident of Elba, a talented sculptor and artist, but he was also “an amazing cook”, his son said.

“I miss the guy a lot. Every time I cook something, I think about the conversations we had in the kitchen,” Jim said during a Tuesday interview with The Batavian. “My parents shook this world.”

Artwork from the collections of John and his wife Sophie Stucko will be on display with late artists Patricia Burr and Eunice Hare Murphy for a first-ever craft sale and Mother’s Day raffle from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. pm Saturday at the Elba Firemen’s Recreation Hall, Route 98, Elba. The event is organized and hosted by Elba Betterment Committee.

“It’s all part of the grant we received from GO Art! for our project: Elba Betterment Committee presents Art Around Town. The idea to include our local artists actually came from one of our members, Kelly Dudley, who has always wanted to do this stuff at The Mill in Elba,” said EBC President Pauli Miano. . “After contacting the families, three were willing and excited to share the talent of their loved ones with us.”

The artist’s pieces will be exhibited in the Rec Hall. Burr and Murphy were art teachers at Elba Central School, and the three artists shared their work in the community by donating pieces to the school, churches and other organizations, Miano said. .

The Stucko couple have collaborated on many projects, Jim said. John made wooden cabinets and Sophie’s handmade stained glass adorned the doors. She was from Batavia and John from Albion, and after they got married they bought a house in Elba, Jim said. His parents were outdoor enthusiasts, and his father commemorated various species of birds and fish in an elaborate fashion.

“The birds were carved, the feathers were burned into the wood for texture, then he painted them. I bet he’s got 100 hours in the paint,” Jim said. “It wasn’t a job; it was a labor of love. He stayed in his studio painting, and if he didn’t like it, he would paint it again.

He remembers his father going through the books to find the right species of bird and refining the colors and textures of each piece. His work became so popular that people offered to commission him for particular projects, although John turned them down. He preferred to create exactly what he wanted, and not necessarily what others had in mind, Jim said. Most likely, the artist was a perfectionist, and it showed in his work.

One of his last pieces was a large woodpecker for someone he connected with for a love of the outdoors and birds.

“It was absolutely breathtaking,” Jim said. “He was highly skilled in many places and he was a people person. Until we started looking through the photos, I never realized how much my dad was smiling.

Jim laughed thinking about his parents’ determination to stay strong – or stubborn in some cases – throughout their busy lives. John Stucko was active in his craft, which included calabash carvings, until his death in 2019 at age 89. Sophie died a few years earlier in 2017 and was 83 years old.

There will be 25 tables of vendors offering craft items and food. The committee wanted to make sure there wouldn’t be a lot of duplicate items, so each vendor has to sell a particular craft. They range from wooden signs and handmade handbags to floral arrangements, ornaments and, for the sweet tooth, a bakery section with cookies, cakes and cannolis, Miano said.

The committee will also serve food for purchase and the first 50 moms will receive a free carnation. Staff from the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office will also be available with photo and fingerprinting materials for families who request them for their children.

Eunice Hare Murphy was a graduate of Elba Central School in 1948. She then earned her degree in art education at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs. She received her Masters in Elementary Education from SUNY Brockport. Her first teaching job was for the West Bloomfield School District. Her family shared that she drives her little Chevy with a standard two-way transmission from Genesee County every day.

Over the years, “Eunie”, as her friends and family called her, taught art at Byron Bergen Central School and ended her successful career as an educator at Elba Central. She taught arts, crafts and photography classes. Eunice was a member of the Writer’s Guild in the 1970s and even dabbled in poetry.

Eunice loved gardening and, using a variety of different rocks and plants, enjoyed creating clever and, at times, quirky gardens. While teaching on Elba, she was an advisor for the yearbook and helped develop the variety show that functioned for years as a fundraiser for the yearbook. Eunice lost her four-year battle with cancer in 1988 at the age of 57.

Patricia Burr’s enthusiasm for painting is evident in a collection of 14 sketchbooks, each with memories of the places and people she visited on vacation, workshops and even in the study room at the studio. Central School of Elba. Besides pencil and ink sketches, a drawing is rendered in brown eyebrow pencil in the dark at Kleinhans Music Hall without a pen.

Her van didn’t leave her house without “the art stuff”, just in case she found an interesting scene. This may be while waiting for the doctor or dentist, or even during downtime during jury duty; it was time for his sketchbook.

Burr’s philosophy was to “make a drawing because you get a lot more information by observing the subject than when you just take a picture”. Jot down some color notes, the date and time of day, the weather next to the sketch to help you when planning to paint later in the studio, she said.
Burr was inspired by fellow painters Margaret M. Martin, Franklin Jones, and Don Getz. She was educated at Albright Art School, Buffalo State College, University at Buffalo, and Rochester Institute of Technology.

Active all her life, Burr died aged 96 in 2014.

For more information, visit: https://www.facebook.com/elbabetterment/

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Top photo: A duck sculpture by the late artist John Stucko and several works by Stucko and artists Patricia Burr and Eunice Hare Murphy will be on display at the Craft Show and Mother’s Day Basket Sale from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Elba Firemen’s Recreation Hall on Route 98, Elba. Photos by Howard Owens.

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First Presbyterian Church in Jerseyville to Host Children at HeART Art Appreciation Event https://jeanspezial.com/first-presbyterian-church-in-jerseyville-to-host-children-at-heart-art-appreciation-event/ Sun, 01 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/first-presbyterian-church-in-jerseyville-to-host-children-at-heart-art-appreciation-event/ JERSEYVILLE — Jerseyville’s First Presbyterian Church, 400 S. State St., will host a Kids at Heart Art Appreciation event celebrating the art of Keith Haring from 4-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 3. This is part of a series of art appreciation classes. Kids at HeART Art Appreciation is an intergenerational course for children of all […]]]>

JERSEYVILLE — Jerseyville’s First Presbyterian Church, 400 S. State St., will host a Kids at Heart Art Appreciation event celebrating the art of Keith Haring from 4-5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 3.

This is part of a series of art appreciation classes. Kids at HeART Art Appreciation is an intergenerational course for children of all ages, from 8 to 88 years old. People can attend one or all of them and are encouraged to dress up really cool for a funky street art making session.

Be sure to bring your imagination and creative genius. Class enrollment is set at 10 students; registration is mandatory. There are no class fees.


To register a child, complete and return this form: https://forms.gle/NMzfwhwkXNgoy4HeA. To register an adult, complete and return this form: https://forms.gle/uGU6TitWf7pga2U5A.

Here’s what else is happening in the area:

MONDAY MAY 2

• Alton City Orchestra Public Rehearsal, Ringhausen Music Building, Lewis and Clark Community College, 5800 Godfrey Road, Godfrey.

• Trent and Nanney: 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Fast Eddie’s Bon Air, 1530 E. 4th St., Alton.

• Smoke’n Aces Poker League Tournament: 6:30 pm to 10 pm, The Back Bar, 228 CN Main St., Edwardsville.

• Women’s Footsteps Study: 12:30-2:30 p.m., Calvary Cares, 1426 Washington Ave., Alton.

• Men’s Footsteps Study: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Calvary Cares, 1426 Washington Ave., Alton.

• Line dancing class: 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Tango Event Center, 212 E. Elm St., Alton.

• Urban Cha Cha Ballroom: 7:30-9:30 p.m., Tango Event Center, 212 E. Elm St. Alton.

• Alton Godfrey Rotary Club Meetings: 6:00 pm, Gentelin’s On Broadway, 122 E. Broadway, Alton.

• Al-Anon meeting: 7:30-8:45 p.m., Bridge Church, E. 12th St., Alton. For more information, call 618-463-2429 or visit SIAFG.org and District-18.org.

• For more information about Al-Anon meetings, call 618-463-2429 or visit SIAFG.org and District-18.org.

TUESDAY MAY 3

• East Alton Farmers’ Market: 3-7 pm, EastGate Plaza parking lot, 625 EastGate Shopping Center, East Alton. Every Tuesday until October 25.

• Meeting of the Godfrey Board of Directors: 6:00 pm, Town Clerk’s Office, Village of Godfrey, 6810 Godfrey Road, Godfrey.

• Kids at Heart Art Appreciation: 4 to 5:30 p.m., Jerseyville First Presbyterian Church, 400 S. State St., Jerseyville.

• Anthony Nanney and Co.: 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Fast Eddie’s Bon Air, 1530 E. 4th St., Alton.

• Chicago Stepping Classes: 6 to 7:30 p.m., Tango Event Center, 212 E. Elm St., Alton.

• Xtreme Bar Bingo: 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Alton Sports Tap, 3812 College Ave., Alton.

• Yoga at the Wildey: 7 to 8 p.m., The Wildey Theatre, 252 N. Main St., Edwardsville.

• Camelot Cribbage Club: 6 p.m., Camelot Bowl, 801 Beltline Road, Collinsville. Takes place every Tuesday. For more information, call Phill at 618-288-7910.

• For more information on Al-Anon meetings, call 618-463-2429. To find more helpful meetings, visit SIAFG.org and District-18.org.

dylan.suttles@thetelegraph.com

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Art Appreciation | Okoboji magazine https://jeanspezial.com/art-appreciation-okoboji-magazine/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/art-appreciation-okoboji-magazine/ Bob Kirschbaum has always been more athletic. Growing up on a farm in southwestern Iowa, he dreamed of joining the professional ranks of Major League Baseball. And although he eventually got an athletic scholarship to Morningside College in Sioux City where he became captain of the baseball team, the big league dream wasn’t meant to […]]]>

Bob Kirschbaum has always been more athletic.

Growing up on a farm in southwestern Iowa, he dreamed of joining the professional ranks of Major League Baseball.

And although he eventually got an athletic scholarship to Morningside College in Sioux City where he became captain of the baseball team, the big league dream wasn’t meant to be.

Kirschbaum would instead pursue a career in education after earning her elementary education degree followed by a master’s degree in educational administration from Drake University in Des Moines.

His assignments as an administrator over the course of 32 years have taken him to districts including, but not limited to, Lawton-Bronson, Logan-Magnolia, Sheldon and Spencer.

The sport remained central as he also coached several sports like track and field, basketball and baseball in addition to his administrative duties.

It was during this time that Kirschbaum’s appreciation for the arts really grew.

“You know, when I first went to Morningside, they were strong in theater and arts, but I didn’t really attend those events,” Kirschbaum said. “Fortunately, I’m gifted and I got married and my wife was much more balanced than me. And when I started coaching I thought I really had to support my athletes in their other events. Well, it turned out that my top athletes were also part of an orchestra, theater and swing choir, so when we started raising our family, we made sure all of our kids were okay surrounded in all kinds of activities. I really believe that the arts are so important to a community.

Kirschbaum won’t be directly involved in the arts for a while yet.

After more than three decades in education, he took a position with the American Red Cross, working in Sioux City and then Dubuque for a total of nine years.

A talk at Okoboji towards the end of those years eventually led to his current position as head of the Pearson Lakes Art Center.

“I happened to be invited to speak to a Kiwanis group in Arrowwood and mentioned during the conference that I was looking to return to the area full-time,” Kirschbaum said.

It turns out that a few board members were in the audience that day and approached Kirschbaum about the possibility of filling a vacancy at the facility.

A month later, he was the art center’s new general manager, a position he has held for six years.

“After speaking with the board, I felt that my skills and the needs of the art center worked really well together and I was delighted to take on the position. It is truly a blessing. I I have always enjoyed working with people. During my career in education I have also been a coach and even in my role as a director I felt that I was always a coach and that the staff were my team”, Kirschbaum said “It was the same with the Red Cross and coming here I felt the same kind of opportunity. I work with a staff that is simply exceptional.

He credited his upbringing for his approach to any professional position he held.

“My parents ran a small business in a small town and it was always about supporting the community and working together and that’s kind of the philosophy that I brought to all the positions I’ve had – that it takes everyone working together,” Kirschbaum mentioned. “I don’t see it any differently here at Okoboji.”

So far during his tenure, many changes, improvements, and renovations have taken place at the Art Center and throughout Iowa’s Great Lakes.

The art center’s Lauridsen Performing Arts Theater audio and video system was recently overhauled and the acoustics continue to undergo upgrades.

On the lower level, major renovations will unveil a new teaching kitchen that will allow for an exponentially greater variety of culinary arts classes and is expected to be completed by Memorial Day weekend.

“It is truly an exciting time to be part of the Pearson Lakes Art Center and it is truly a pleasure to be part of the leadership in the Lake District. I really enjoy working with all the other directors and we really try to work together for the good of the community,” Kirschbaum said. “I think if someone were to fall from the sky, land here and ask if this was heaven, we would say no, it’s Okoboj. It’s just such a positive place.

This positivity not only comes from a fantastic staff and great community, but also from a wonderfully supportive Board of Directors and generous benefactors.

“One of our big goals to start with is to make this the most welcoming place in the community. That’s why we have Kindermusik here and work with other organizations to organize events here. Once we get people in, we know they’ll want to come back,” Kirschbaum said. “And none of this would be possible without many generous people – our donors and supporters make this place possible.”

It’s a place that Kirschbaum considers the cultural center of northwest Iowa and he is committed to continuing and enhancing that legacy.

“It’s uplifting and energizing to know that you’re working with people who are trying to do their best for the community. We have a very supportive and fantastic board and they all want to make improvements,” Kirschbaum said. “You must have a reason to get up every day and I can’t think of a better place to be.”

Perhaps that’s why retirement isn’t a question the 70-year-old has yet seriously pondered.

“Right now, I have no desire to retire,” Kirschbaum said. “I love coming to work every day. I love the work and the people I work with and I’m involved with all the great entertainment, great artists and people who visit here.

This includes people from all of these school districts throughout her career path to the art center.

“Someone from Dunlap, or Sheldon, or somewhere will stop and say, Hey Mr. K! Remember me? So many positive memories and I won’t get to meet these people again if I wasn’t here in Okoboji,” Kirschbaum said.

They are sure to return as the arts center continues to book a full range of performing arts entertainment, a diverse and comprehensive schedule of art exhibitions, a wide variety of educational opportunities for all ages, and improvements large and small throughout the property. .

Changes and upgrades to the ArtSmart Handy Room will continue to enhance this asset, while the exterior will also command attention with plans to expand the pathway network, install pollinator-friendly plants and perhaps add more sculptures.

“At the end of the day, we just want to make everything better,” Kirschbaum said. “We want to help beautify the area for our visitors and local residents to enjoy 12 months a year.”

He is also sure that there are many people like him who he hopes will come to see all the benefits the arts have to offer.

“There’s a lot of ‘Bobs’ there and we have a lot of opportunities for adults and it’s just a great place to bring your kids. We’ve got the whole school show coming up and those kids will bring their families, parents and grandparents to see their works displayed right next to world-class art and that’s why I think the art center helps the community be more balanced,” says Kirschbaum. “It brings more depth and breadth to the community.

He refers to his sporting roots to describe his passion and effectiveness in promoting the arts.

“People ask me how I can promote the arts with my background and I say the best managers in baseball weren’t the stars of the team. They had to work hard just to be a bench player,” Kirschbaum said. “Well, here my background is not in art, but nobody believes in art anymore and the importance of being a well-rounded person and community, so it’s really easy for me to go out and promote.”

And he does it with a strong team of family, friends, staff, donors and board members who strive to achieve the same goals.

“I have been blessed. When I was a coach I had great kids and as a manager and at the Red Cross I always worked with great people. My family has always been fantastic and supportive,” Kirschbaum said. ” It’s the same thing here. I have just been truly blessed and greatly appreciate the opportunities here at Okoboji.

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The Cooper Corner Gallery refreshes its walls and sparks appreciation for art throughout the community https://jeanspezial.com/the-cooper-corner-gallery-refreshes-its-walls-and-sparks-appreciation-for-art-throughout-the-community/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-cooper-corner-gallery-refreshes-its-walls-and-sparks-appreciation-for-art-throughout-the-community/ Local artists Mark Simpkins and Carla Reed work together to move artwork to the Cooper Art Gallery in downtown Glenwood Springs.Chelsea Independent/post-independent At the corner of Cooper Avenue and Eighth Street, a selection of colorful paintings, landscape photos mixed with decorative bowls, mugs and vases attract window shoppers to Cooper Corner Gallery. Inside, artists and […]]]>

Local artists Mark Simpkins and Carla Reed work together to move artwork to the Cooper Art Gallery in downtown Glenwood Springs.
Chelsea Independent/post-independent

At the corner of Cooper Avenue and Eighth Street, a selection of colorful paintings, landscape photos mixed with decorative bowls, mugs and vases attract window shoppers to Cooper Corner Gallery.

Inside, artists and volunteers refreshed the selection last week with new works, new paint for the walls and a rotation of displays to keep the gallery fresh.

“We have 24 artists and 24 display locations in the store,” said Judy Burke, a clay artist who enjoys making mugs. “Once every three or four months or so, we rotate the space based on a schedule we created together.”



Local artist Carla Reed paints a wall before hanging artwork at the Cooper Art Gallery in downtown Glenwood.
Chelsea Independent/post-independent

Unlike some art galleries, Cooper Corner is owned and operated by the artists, who take turns tending the registry and collectively making day-to-day business decisions.

“The atmosphere of the partnership is like a family,” said Annie Brooks, who works with glass and clay. “Because we all take turns running the shop, we have to get to know each other’s work, and in some cases I feel like I know other artists’ work almost as well as my own. .”



Working in partnership allows artists to avoid consignment fees, keeping their prices lower than what a client might expect at similar galleries.

“We want everyday working men and women to be able to afford art,” Brooks said.

A painter of all mediums except oil, Nancy Martin said the gallery appeals to art lovers of all ages.

“We get a surprising number of kids, who come to buy art for their parents and family,” Martin explained. “Art appreciation starts young, and we want to nurture it as much as possible.”

Becoming a gallery partner is a process, and like many aspects of the business, the process is facilitated by a committee of partners.

“I lead the jury committee,” Brooks said. “Which just means I’m the first point of contact for most applicants.”

Potential partners should be local, as part of partnering requires working at the store at least once a month. Once admitted, the partner is then trained on the register, store operations, artist rotation schedules and educated on the works of each of the 24 partners.

While egalitarian, the model is not a get-rich-quick scheme.

“None of us are paying our mortgages with this,” Brooks said. “But one of our greatest points of satisfaction is meeting with our customers. And it’s being part of a community of artists.

As the pandemic wanes, Burke said the gallery is looking forward to a year without face masks and hopefully without any natural disasters.

“The joy of being a partner here is meeting new people, new artists and adapting as life changes,” Burke said, recalling the roller coaster of running a business. local in 2020 and 2021.

Burke said the gallery’s clientele spans the West Slope, but locals keep the artists working.

“Our local customers are the reason we are here,” she said. “We are truly grateful for the support we have received, especially over the past two difficult years.”

Reporter Ike Fredregill can be reached at 970-384-9154 or by email at ifredregill@postindependent.com.

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Art Appreciation: Where Beauty Begins | Life & Arts https://jeanspezial.com/art-appreciation-where-beauty-begins-life-arts/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 15:54:53 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/art-appreciation-where-beauty-begins-life-arts/ The art is difficult to understand, with many descriptions varying by period, expert interpretation, and social norms. The understanding of art was attributed to the ranks of the upper class. Throughout history, art and portrait commissions have been primarily available to the wealthy with limited access to the general public, and over time this practice […]]]>

The art is difficult to understand, with many descriptions varying by period, expert interpretation, and social norms. The understanding of art was attributed to the ranks of the upper class. Throughout history, art and portrait commissions have been primarily available to the wealthy with limited access to the general public, and over time this practice has continued. Middle- and lower-class populations began to see art as a medium that stood out from those who were sufficiently sophisticated. The only difference between middle class and upper class is money, otherwise they are all human.

As previously mentioned, art is an experience that elicits a response, which can range from transcendental enlightenment to terrifying terror. Such reactions occur due to personal experiences, biases, beliefs and practices, each of which varies from person to person. No matter what artwork we will react to a work, but many of us won’t mention why. Although the understanding of art is subject to much critical analysis, contradiction and confusion, asking the simple question “Why?” is a step forward.

While personal perspectives are the dependent variable of an artistic experience, what is independent and will always be perceived are its characteristics, which include important characteristics such as: who or what is the subject? Who is in the scene? Is it historical or contemporary? Does he share a message? How is it presented? Even smaller but basic details add to the perception, like: What colors were used? How is the lighting used? How is the brush stroke used? What is the size of the room? Where, or how, is it shown?

Once we have questioned and identified these factors, we can ask the introspective questions of why it is beautiful, shameful, mocking, satirical, etc. the length and steps the artist took to convey such sentiment. And in such a performance of human emotion and connectedness, that’s where we find the beauty. As viewers, we have the task of filtering the piece through our emotions, then tweaking and refining that experience with the journey in understanding its reaction.

The most widely accepted and pleasing work of art which has become the adequate symbol of beauty is the work of Botticelli”The birth of Venus”, appealing to all the senses of beauty in human consciousness. The goddess of beauty and love emerges from the pristine nature, being presented in the vulnerability of the nude, presented with clothes and flowers by figures rushing to her side as if authority and power had been given since birth. Botticelli’s use of supple skin and delicate fabrics adds to the serenity of the piece. From its material to its theme, beauty is the pinnacle of the piece.

A much more complicated piece that contemplates beauty is that of Edward Okun”war and us», mixing aesthetics and vehemence in a homogeneous way. A frenzy of serpent-like beings colored vibrant blue and decorated with butterfly wings on their heads bite and thrash about in the turmoil around the centerpiece of the painting. Three human figures painted in dark, solid colors calmly cross the chaotic landscape. While the dynamism of the snakes draws the viewer’s attention a lot, the stark contrast caused by the central characters brings a sense of humility, hope and peace. We see that Okun wanted to achieve this level of contrast, and such oxymoronic elements elevate us to the feeling that Okun was aiming to achieve.

Such a view of art appreciation can work in other forms, such as photography, music, dance, food, fashion, and even furniture. The appreciation we give to these details in our daily lives can lift us into a much more attractive world.

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Getting acquainted with “art” with the Nambucca Valley Art Appreciation Group – News from the region https://jeanspezial.com/getting-acquainted-with-art-with-the-nambucca-valley-art-appreciation-group-news-from-the-region/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 03:56:36 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/getting-acquainted-with-art-with-the-nambucca-valley-art-appreciation-group-news-from-the-region/ Gallery of group members looking into the Stringer Gallery at Nambucca Heads as part of a course entitled Treasures of Australian Art. HAVE YOU EVER seen a painting in an art gallery and thought, “I wonder what this is? “ If so, here is the opportunity to discover “the art” of it. The Nambucca Valley […]]]>


Gallery of group members looking into the Stringer Gallery at Nambucca Heads as part of a course entitled Treasures of Australian Art.

HAVE YOU EVER seen a painting in an art gallery and thought, “I wonder what this is? “

If so, here is the opportunity to discover “the art” of it.

The Nambucca Valley Art Appreciation Group aims to give members insight and history into the history of famous Australian works of art and guidelines on how to approach paintings.

The group has grown in number in the Nambucca Valley over the past ten years and now has over 80 members.

The current course is focused on “Australian Art and Social History”.

“We examine the work of renowned artists and consider their works in relation to the social history of the times they lived,” said Marlene Griffin, Nambucca Valley Art Appreciation Group.

“Many of these artists have led colorful lives and we explore their experiences and exploits.

“There is often a humorous, entertaining and sometimes outrageous element in the life story of many of these artists,” said Marlene.

The very first Australian artist, John Lewin, somehow missed the sailboat between England and Australia and his poor wife sailed into the unknown without him.

It took another two years before the couple reunited and could begin to paint the flora and fauna of this strange land.

Before the Covid-19 restrictions, members of the Art Appreciation group enjoyed face-to-face meetings.

Currently, members share the course via email with images of artwork sent to members in each mailing.

A mailing is sent to members every two weeks.

The course is free for anyone wishing to register.

Marlene said the Group has big plans for the coming year.

“Our first artist of 2022 will be one of Australia’s most acclaimed artists,” said Marlene.

“He is often known as the ‘Master of the gum trees.’

“You’ve probably guessed it’s Hans Heysen.

“We will follow that up with an equally interesting story of his most famous daughter; Australia’s first female war artist and the first female artist to win the Archibald Prize – Nora Heysen, ”said Marlene.

Group members can participate by giving their views on specific artists or works of art, but there is no obligation to respond to mailings.

You can just enjoy the stories and hopefully get inspired by them.

For more information or to join the course, email Marlene Griffin at [email protected].

The Group can provide members with guidelines on how to approach paintings.


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The Art Appreciation Society is here to demystify art – The New Indian Express https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art-the-new-indian-express/ As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and […]]]>


As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and cultural heritage, and Arjun Guleria, co-founder of the design and communication agency. , Beam & Words.

Growing up with parents who were art collectors, Savara was exposed to the art world from an early age. The holidays have always revolved around culturally stimulating experiences in museums and galleries, and she credits them to her continued interest over the years. “When you’re surrounded by something of great ferocity and intensity, it’s inevitable to fall in love with it,” she says. With a law degree in hand, she was able to combine her two skills by initiating a practice in art law in a leading law firm. As a lawyer in art, antiques and cultural heritage, she rejoices in the belief that while she cannot create art, she can at least protect it.

Guleria, on the other hand, had no previous exposure to this area and was presented there by Savara, whom he has accompanied to art exhibitions over the years. His inexperience sparked conversations about the intimidating nature of the fine art, one that instilled a fear of judgment in asking the wrong questions or not knowing who to ask. They soon realized that there were many more like Guleria, of all ages and genders, who had a desire to explore this world but didn’t know how or where to start. This awareness led to the birth of TAAS, to make art accessible and encourage inclusiveness. By initiating conversations and questions, organizing guided tours of art exhibitions, organizing workshops led by experts and artists, as well as technical and theoretical series, they attract an interested audience of people inclined to the creation of all walks of life.

Arjun Guleria and Tejshree Savara

Bhavna Kakar, founder of Gallery Latitude 28, appreciates the knowledgeable and interested audience they attract – an audience that appreciates the experience, asks the right questions and comes back for more. Lifestyle brand writer and blogger Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap, a regular attendee of TAAS events, attributes their appeal to the immersive experience they provide by encouraging constant organic dialogue between audiences. Lively conversations, facilitated by dynamic conservatives like Shaunak Mahbubani, are the main reason litigation lawyer Arjun Narayan frequents these events.


Take away food
✥ Tejshree Savara brings knowledge of art, Arjun Guleria creates conversation around events
✥ They prefer to work with young and dynamic people who are known to create engaging and meaningful conversations around art
Events are free
Events and promotions are run entirely by volunteers
✥ They plan to include intangible works of art in the future – music, dance, film, among other mediums
✥ We can keep up to date with the latest news of their events via their Instagram page @theartappreciationsociety


Although Covid-19 has been a spoiler by causing many last-minute event cancellations, the number of attendees at TAAS events has increased dramatically. Most importantly, the art fraternity takes note of these young enthusiasts and future collectors. A recent collaboration took place with Terrain.art, the world’s first blockchain-based art ecosystem in India, who reached out to them after hearing about their work. At the end of September, an engaged group of about 20 participants took part in a curator-led guided tour and artist interaction at Bikaner House in Delhi, where over 100 works of art by 35 artists through mediums AI paint was presented.

Their first contact with digital art, Savara shares: “It’s really fascinating to explore and understand NFT / Crypto art and since this is a very recent art offering it would be even more interesting to see what direction this will take over the next few years! “

Despite many challenges, TAAS has gained a foothold in the esoteric ecosystem, with exciting plans for expansion and growth. Guleria sums it up best when he says: “I don’t think you can ever claim to know enough about the art world. And that, in my experience, holds true for almost anything you are passionate about. TAAS events are currently free.


]]>
The Art Appreciation Society is here to demystify art https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 07:44:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/the-art-appreciation-society-is-here-to-demystify-art/ As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and […]]]>


As in most fraternities, the Indian art world has its own cliques, welcoming into its fold only those who create the art or those who understand its layered modalities. This long-standing exclusive is slowly evolving thanks to the work of The Art Appreciation Society (TAAS), founded by Tejshree Savara, legal advisor in art, antiques and cultural heritage, and Arjun Guleria, co-founder of the design and communication agency. , Beam & Words.

Growing up with parents who were art collectors, Savara was exposed to the art world from an early age. The holidays have always revolved around culturally stimulating experiences in museums and galleries, and she credits them to her continued interest over the years. “When you are surrounded by something of great ferocity and intensity, it is inevitable to fall in love with it,” she says. With a law degree in hand, she was able to combine her two skills by initiating a practice in art law in a leading law firm. As a lawyer specializing in art, antiques and cultural heritage, she rejoices in the belief that while she cannot create art, she can at least protect it.

Guleria, on the other hand, had no previous exposure to this area and was presented there by Savara, whom he has accompanied to art exhibitions over the years. His inexperience sparked conversations about the intimidating nature of the fine art, one that instilled a fear of judgment in asking the wrong questions or not knowing who to ask. They soon realized that there were many more like Guleria, of all ages and genders, who had a desire to explore this world but didn’t know how or where to start. This awareness led to the birth of TAAS, to make art accessible and encourage inclusiveness. By initiating conversations and questions, organizing guided tours of art exhibitions, organizing workshops led by experts and artists, as well as technical and theoretical series, they attract an interested audience of people inclined to the creation of all walks of life.

Bhavna Kakar, founder of Gallery Latitude 28, appreciates the knowledgeable and interested audience they attract – an audience that appreciates the experience, asks the right questions and comes back for more. Lifestyle brand writer and blogger Sumiran Annamaria Kashyap, a regular attendee of TAAS events, attributes their appeal to the immersive experience they provide by encouraging constant organic dialogue between audiences. Lively conversations, facilitated by dynamic conservatives like Shaunak Mahbubani, are the main reason litigation lawyer Arjun Narayan frequents these events.


Take away food
✥ Tejshree Savara brings knowledge of art, Arjun Guleria creates conversation around events
✥ They prefer to work with young and dynamic people who are known to create engaging and meaningful conversations around art
Events are free
Events and promotions are run entirely by volunteers
✥ They plan to include intangible works of art in the future – music, dance, cinema, among other mediums
✥ We can keep up to date with the latest news of their events via their Instagram page @theartappreciationsociety


Although Covid-19 has been a spoiler by causing many last-minute event cancellations, the number of attendees at TAAS events has increased dramatically. Most importantly, the art fraternity takes note of these young enthusiasts and future collectors. A recent collaboration took place with Terrain.art, the world’s first blockchain-based art ecosystem in India, who reached out to them after hearing about their work. At the end of September, an engaged group of about 20 participants took part in a curator-led guided tour and artist interaction at Bikaner House in Delhi, where over 100 works of art by 35 artists through mediums AI paint was presented.

Their first contact with digital art, Savara shares: “It’s really fascinating to explore and understand NFT / Crypto art and since this is a very recent art offering it would be even more interesting to see what direction this will take over the next few years! “

Despite many challenges, TAAS has gained a foothold in the esoteric ecosystem, with exciting plans for expansion and growth. Guleria sums it up best when he says: “I don’t think you can ever claim to know enough about the art world. And that, in my experience, holds true for almost anything you are passionate about. TAAS events are currently free.


]]>
Palacio de Memoria boosts appreciation for art with an outdoor flea market https://jeanspezial.com/palacio-de-memoria-boosts-appreciation-for-art-with-an-outdoor-flea-market/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jeanspezial.com/palacio-de-memoria-boosts-appreciation-for-art-with-an-outdoor-flea-market/ The Filipino star October 21, 2021 | 00h00 As one of the leading and ardent defenders of arts and culture, Palacio de Memoria offers the public something to look forward to: a two-day open-air fair open to all art lovers and visitors. This seven-story cultural provider will showcase the best of Filipino and European cultural […]]]>


The Filipino star

October 21, 2021 | 00h00

As one of the leading and ardent defenders of arts and culture, Palacio de Memoria offers the public something to look forward to: a two-day open-air fair open to all art lovers and visitors.

This seven-story cultural provider will showcase the best of Filipino and European cultural heritage through a European-themed flea market, which runs October 23-24.

Inspired by El Rastro or ‘The Trail’, the most popular open-air flea market in Madrid, Spain, the Palacio de Memoria aims to bring the colorful, fun and vibrant party to fairground goers looking for bargains. , antique shops and gourmet delicacies. The two-day arts and antiques fair will be filled with various commodities, from works of art to antiques, paintings, sculptures, accessories, textiles, home furnishings and decor, wall art, gift items, toys, craft specialty items / from designers, and collectibles to tickle the fancy of any art buyer. The best of Filipino artists and artisans will be offered by Arte Fino.

The activities and stands of the fair will allow visitors to discover art and culture in different forms. On both days, the Open Bar by Distileria Limtuaco, Don Papa Rum will give a taste of what it’s like to hang out in an old-fashioned European bar. Visitors to the show can look forward to an exclusive menu at The Loggia by Margarita Fore’s Food & Libation booth, a true showcase of European cuisine at its best.

On October 23, The Loggia, along with Tanqueray and Moet & Chandon, will take street food to new heights at the Galeria de Gunita, while ABS-CBN Film Restoration Inc. will host an exclusive screening of the newly restored 1941 film made. by Ibong Adarna. by Vicente Salumbides on October 24.

The Palacio also invites those interested to a university gathering filled with literary, artistic and cultural exchanges inspired by Spanish tertulias or evenings from the colonial era.

Tertulia de Memoria on October 30 will allow guests to experience a weekend of intellectual exchange through an evening organized by The Loggia by Margarita Fore’s, an Open Bar by Distileria Limtuaco and Don Papa Rum, and a sunset film screening. sun by ABS-CBN Film Restauration, and many other activities.

The Palacio de Memoria implements strict sanitary protocols in order to offer a safe place to all visitors who wish to enjoy their passions again or to those looking for unique experiences. Parents and renters can also enjoy the event as children and pet dogs are welcome at the two-day fair. Art and culture lovers can check out more details on the activities by following Palacio de Memoria on Facebook and visiting their website to see the full program of October activities or to book guided tours and events at the Palacio .


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